The Waterloo Association: Members Area

The Correspondence of Major General William Henry Pringle

Courtesy of the John Rylands Library – Reference  GB 133 Eng MS 1273

Born on 21 August 1772, William Henry Pringle was the eldest son of Major General Henry Pringle. He joined the army as a Cornet in the 16th Light Dragoons in 1792 and rose steadily to become a Major General on 1 January 1812 on his return from Canada. He was initially placed on the staff of Wellington’s army, but was given command of a brigade in the 5th Division in late June 1812 and led this brigade at the Battle of Salamanca on the 22 July. His divisional commander (Leith) being wounded in the battle, he led the division until the arrival of General Hulse on 31 July. However, Hulse fell ill and died on 7 September, when Pringle took command again. He led the division in the unfortunate siege of Burgos and subsequent retreat to the Portuguese border. He then resumed command of his brigade, which he led at Villa Muriel on 25 October 1812. Pringle was allowed to go home in January 1813 – reason? Whilst in England he did attend the House of Commons and voted on 10 February and 2 March 1813. During his absence he lost command of his brigade.

Returning to Portugal in June 1813, he was eventually appointed to command a brigade in the 2nd Division, commanding the division in the early stages of the Sorauren campaign until General William Stewart arrived from the rear. He took command of the division on 30 July when General Stewart was wounded at Buenza and retained command until Stewart returned in early August. He led his brigade at the NIvelle and St Pierre (at this battle he defeated a force more than twice his own size). At the Battle of Garris on 15 February 1814, Pringle was shot through the body but survived. He took command of the division on 7 May when General Stewart sailed home until General Anson took command on 25 May.

Pringle had no other major commands, but duly became a Lieutenant General in 1825 and he died 23 December 1840. Views of Pringle are mixed, with his own AQMG describing him as ‘a man who is liked by all the world in private life, and respected by no one in public’ [1] whereas Captain Cadell of the 28th Foot described him as ‘gallant’.

He married Harriet Hester Eliot on 20 May 1806, the heiress of the Honourable Edward James Eliot, and they had 1 son and 4 daughters.

To Mrs Pringle 16 Manchester Street, London[2].

Portsmouth, 6 April [1812]

I arrived here perfectly well yesterday evening & found on my arrival that all the troops had embarked & that the convoy was to sail this morning, which annoyed me a good deal, as I had not made the least preparation for going so soon & this morning I was called at daylight to say the wind was fair, which made me fear I should not have had time to write a line to my adored Harriet which would have distressed me most extremely. But since then, the wind has changed, and we shall not go today, but the moment the wind is fair we are to sail. I trust my darling love that you got into your house yesterday & found it to your liking, I thought of you every moment of the day & of every mark of your kind and caring affection, which you have bestowed me. Believe me my Harriet it is not lost bestowed on me, it is not possible for the human heart to love more ardently than I do you & ever shall. I trust I shall tomorrow hear of your being perfectly well. I cannot divest myself of a thousand fears for your dear health. I got here in good time yesterday & had a bedroom kept for me, which was fortunate, as the town was never more full & not a place to be got in the inn. I am sorry to say my horses are not embarked, nor is there a ship ready to receive them at present, so that when they can go is very uncertain. I am extremely vexed at this as I dread having them under the care of the boy, which I must do, however I cannot help it. I have left money with the boy to pay for the keep of the horses here & taken all the precautions I can to prevent anything going wrong. I have left your address with the boy, to write to you, in case of his wanting anything more than I have provided for & in that case you will act as you think best, either by writing or sending Hawter[3] down, which perhaps would be best, though I hope & think you will not be troubled by any application from him as I have, I think, left money enough. My horses stand at the George Inn[4], General Goldie[5] & I are to embark in the Romulus, I hear a very good ship, a 36 gun frigate. We have sent our heavy baggage on board this day, it will be a great annoyance, our horses not going with us, as we shall have to wait doing nothing at Lisbon till they arrive there. However, I hear it is what happens to almost every general officer who goes out from here. I found the admiral here very civil, but he like every other seaman, thinks there is no kind of hardship in an officer going onboard without any preparation whatever. I wish you my love to write me a line every day till you know I have sailed, ere I shall order the boy to go to the Post Office every day after I go & any letter might come from you, to direct it to 16 Manchester Street. This is not a very comfortable place as you may suppose, however I am very glad I was not obliged to sail today, as it would have put me to the greatest inconvenience.  I hope my beloved Harriet, you will take great care of yourself for my sake & go out in the carriage as soon as you can, God bless you my wife and love, believe me you are dearer to me ten thousand times than my life. Give my love to the children. I am your ever faithful & affectionate husband WH Pringle.

Billet 1812

To Mrs Pringle, 16 Manchester Street, Manchester Square, London. Re directed to the Honourable Miss Townshend, Windsor Castle.

Lisbon, Wednesday 20 May 1812

Although no mail goes from here my beloved Harriet before Saturday, I cannot let this day pass, without writing you a line, to assure you of the sentiments I feel on the return of this day, believe me my darling love, this day is as dear to me now, as it was our first wedding day. I look on it as the day that has given me all the happiness of my life & every succeeding year, proves still more to me how happy, truly happy you have made me. I wish I had an opportunity of sending you over some little present today, but I can with truth assure you, my beloved Harriet, that you have every feeling of affection & fondness my heart is capable of. This is the first anniversary of this day, we have been separated & I trust before the next we shall have met again. The wind has been so contrary that no packet has come from England & I am still in anxious expectation of hearing from you. I trust a few days will relieve my suspense, for I feel it a very long time indeed, since your last letter.

The horses are not yet come & I fear from this wind, they will have a tedious bad passage. I have written to Lord Wellington to explain the cause of my having been delayed so long at Lisbon. I met Charles Cocks yesterday[6], at dinner at the admiral’s, I had not known he was here, he is come to Lisbon for a few days only, with his youngest brother[7], he is very well. I can tell you nothing new from here, the army are quite quiet at present, which a little reconciles me to my being so long detained here, but it is a very unpleasant place & I am most anxious to get away from it. Adieu for today my own Harriet, if I have an opportunity before Saturday of sending this I will, God bless you my love, farewell.

Saturday, no packet has yet arrived my Harriet, so I am still in anxious suspense about you, the wind has got more fair so I hope my love, before long I shall have the happiness of hearing from you. It is now nearly a month since I had that pleasure. I hope in two or three days now, the horses must come & I shall be most happy to get away from Lisbon. I have been very well ever since I came here.

The weather is now very warm, but it does not hurt me. General Goldie who came out with me is very unwell, with the gout flying about him & I fear he will not be able to go up to the army[8]. Yesterday Charles Cocks & his brother dined with me, to try my new cook, who I think will answer my purpose very well. My establishment is not very smart as I have only John to do everything, but I dare say I shall get on very well, my canteens & things I brought out with me answer very well. Cocks is a very fine young man & likely to make an excellent officer, his brother is but a poor creature, I cannot conceive what he came out here for. I trust my darling Harriet that you are comfortable & go out a good deal. I wish it was possible for me to hear oftener from you, but I know it is not practicable. I believe Lord Liverpool is the Secretary of State[9], that the dispatches for the army go through, perhaps you might get his leave to send yours to his office it might be more certain, particularly when you are out of town, however when you are in town if your letters are sent to the Foreign Office in Lombard Street & paid, they are sure to come. Servants are often lazy & put them into the receiving houses, which is not near so certain. Be very particular my love in your account of yourself & how you pass your time &c, I hope your horses are to your satisfaction & that you are not annoyed by anything. Here I have very seldom dined at home, but I assure you, the price of everything eatable is more than double what it is in London & extremely bad & there is nothing to be bought in the shops but the worst of English goods. I am happy to hear the young animals are so well, give them a kiss from me. God bless you my beloved Harriet, you are dearer to me than words can express, believe me ever yours most faithfully & affectionately WH Pringle.

Major General Pringle, Lisbon

[Fuente]Guinaldo, 21 May 1812

Sir,

I have received and laid before the commander of the forces your letter of the 16th instant, explaining the causes which have detained you at Lisbon, and I am directed to assure you, that His Lordship does not attribute the delay which has taken place in your setting out for the army, to any want of exertion on your part. I have the honour to be Sir, your obedient servant, Fitzroy Somerset, Military Secretary.

Cypher issued 28 May 1812

Cypher

The ten accompanying slips of paper contain the letters of the alphabet (except the letter j) in two series; those of the first series marked A on the back of each are to be used as the alphabet of the cypher. The second series marked B are the letters of the alphabet also, but are to be used as the cypher. Characters representing the former. The letter j is left out in order to make the number of letters one which is divisible without leaving a remainder and the letter has a further use to be explained presently.

The correspondent is to be furnished with ten pieces of paper on which the letters are to be placed in similar order marked respectively A or B, the size of them is immaterial.

The mode of using this cypher is to lay the five slips marked A in a line on a table. To lay those marked B exactly under them, fitting them close so that a letter of the series B is exactly under one of the series A. In making a communication there is to be no separation of words. No capital letters, no figures, no heading, nor is any date to be placed separately either at top or bottom; but it must be wrote in regularly as part of the communication. In addressing the correspondent the first ten letters must consist of the initial letters of each slip of paper, which are to show the position of the papers by stating the first letter of the left hand paper of the series A followed by the first letter of the paper B placed directly under it. Next comes the first letter of the second paper A followed by the first letter of the second paper B under the second paper A. This is continued until the position of the ten papers are detailed. The eleventh letter is the first of the communication and is found by looking in the upper or A series for the letter of the alphabet wanted and writing down as its character or representative that one in the lower or B series directly under it. When a line or two has been written in this manner, the letter j is put down. This is the signal for a new order in the placing of the papers, which are to be shaken together and laid afresh, those of the A series as before, in an upper line, those of the other series directly under them. The ten following j are to describe the new position of the papers as the first ten letters did, and the eleventh letter from j resumes the communication. When it is wished to change again the j is to be used again & invariably the ten following letters are to describe a new order of position of the papers. When j occurs in spelling any word i must be substituted in its stead.

The correspondence on receiving his letter looks at the first ten letters in order to place his papers in their proper order. He then writes down the letters of the series A which are directly over the letters of the B series used as the cypher, he then ticks off with a pencil the separation of the words and has the information which was sent him.

He is of course to observe that on every appearance of the j the next ten letters indicate the position of the papers.  The difficulty of deciphering this, as of every other cypher will be much increased by the introduction of a sign for nonsense. The contraction for and (+) may be used for this purpose – all the letters from the sign of nonsense to the letter j may be written down promiscuously having no signification whatever. The letter might begin with the sign of nonsense and it would then continue in force till j should indicate a position of the slips of paper.

To Mrs Pringle 6 Manchester Street scored out – forwarded to Tunbridge Wells

6 July 1812, Camp near Rueda[10],

Since I last wrote to you my beloved Harriet I have received your dear letter of the 7th June & was made most happy by it, to hear that your visit to Windsor had agreed so well with you & that you found yourself better than you had been, since I left you. My mind was very much disturbed about the state of your health, ever since I came to this country. But now my love, I trust I shall daily hearing that you get stout again & I will endeavour not to make myself unhappy from my anxiety about you, but you are so very very dear to me, my adored Harriet, that when I am away from you, I feel it difficult not to allow myself to be depressed by a thousand fears & anxiety’s. Since my last letter to you from Salamanca[11], we have been marching towards the River Douro, which the French have now passed, with very little opposition on their part & they are retired towards Valladolid. Our army is now encamped near the river & I am in a cottage near the camp, where I am very comfortable. I cannot attempt to tell you what the plans of the campaign are, for Lord Wellington keeps everything an impenetrable secret, but it appears as if it had been his object, to get the possession of all this fine corn country between Salamanca & the Douro, now that the harvest is just beginning. I find myself very comfortable under General Leith’s command & with my brigade which is a very good one. It consists now of two battalions of the 4th & the 30th & 44th Regiments[12], they are not very strong, but on the whole is stronger than most brigades. This kind of life agrees very well with me & I find my health as good as in England. I find great difficulty in getting anything for my table except rations, which however consist of very good beef & bread & my cook is accustomed to campaigning & manages to make a dinner out of them, though I am not able to see company as I should wish, but I hope soon to be able to buy a flock of sheep which is quite missing in this country. I have been rather unlucky in my horses & mules since I came here, I have lost one which cost me a good deal of money & the chestnut mare is so lame that I must give up all thoughts of riding her, the little bay coach horse also has had a strain which has lamed him, but I hope he will get better. The bay horse & the horse I bought before I left London, are in great force & stand their work very well. The great coach horse I found perfectly useless, as I could not ride him & he would not carry baggage well, therefore I sold him for £50, which was much more than he was worth to me & the first opportunity I shall buy a riding horse. I have now given you a full account of my stud & I know everything interests you of my concerns. I am very much obliged to my Harriet for speaking to Mr Eliot about the qualification, had it been necessary before an election it would have been vexatious to have omitted it. I know it is difficult to find out Lord Eliot’s intentions[13], but I have great hopes from his letter that he will comply with our wishes, which will certainly be of advantage to us & our children. Be assured my beloved wife, I take every care of myself for your sake, as long as you value my life, it shall always be of value to me, on that depends all my wish for living. I am happy to hear the princesses attention to you, & I hope now that you are getting well that you will go out as much as you can. I cannot help often thinking of the happy life we have passed at poor Waltons, but I trust we shall enjoy the same happy days again without the drawback we had there. The life we lead here is an extraordinary one, perfectly that of a gipsy. Our complexions are now pretty much of their colour. If I can, I will write to Lord Chatham[14] today. God bless, you my own Harriet, give my affectionate love to the children & believe me for ever yours, most faithfully and fondly WH Pringle

5th Division

Return of Officers Killed, Wounded and Missing   22 July 1812

Rank & Names Regiments Remarks
Lieutenant Colonel J Barnes 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Captain A Logan 1st (or Royals) Wounded Slightly
Lieutenant A E Kellett 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Lieutenant J E O’Neil 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Lieutenant Neils Falck 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Lieutenant J McKilligan 1st (or Royals) Wounded Slightly
Lieutenant William Clarke 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Ensign John Stoyte 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Volunteer Robert McAlpin 1st (or Royals) Wounded Severely
Lieutenant J Ackland 9th Foot Wounded Slightly
Volunteer F Perry 9th Foot Wounded Severely
Lieutenant Colonel E Miles 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Severely
Captain Thomas Willshire 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Captain J L Gallee 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Captain Archibald Fullarton 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Severely
Lieutenant William Ince 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Lieutenant John Peddie 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Severely
Lieutenant W I Laws 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Severely
Ensign J Wheatley 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Severely
Ensign M Magee 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Ensign Robert Willcocks 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Ensign Edward Byam 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Severely
Ensign George Freer 38th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Captain James Taylor 38th Foot 1st Battalion Killed
Lieutenant Broomfield 38th Foot 1st Battalion Killed
Lieutenant McPherson 38th Foot 2nd Battalion Wounded Severely
Ensign Anderson 38th Foot 2nd Battalion Wounded Severely
Captain F Luder Brunswick Light Infantry Wounded Severely
Major O’Halloran 4th Foot 1st Battalion Wounded Slightly
Lieutenant J Garvey 30th Foot Wounded Slightly
Captain J Berwick 44th Foot Killed
Ensign W Standley 44th Foot Killed
Lieutenant Jose M Leita 15th Regiment of the Line Portuguese Killed
Ensign M de Cunha Cabforada 15th Regiment of the Line Portuguese Killed
Ensign J F Cardoza 3rd Regiment of the Line Portuguese Wounded Slightly
Lieutenant Bento Gleiz 15th Regiment of the Line Portuguese Wounded Severely
Ensign J M Mais 15th Regiment of the Line Portuguese Wounded Slightly
Major Hill 8th Cacadores Wounded Severely
Captain Debraino 8th Cacadores Wounded Severely
Ensign Peiria 8th Cacadores Wounded Slightly
Lieutenant General James Leith Severely Wounded not dangerously
Lieutenant Andrew Leith Hay 29th Foot Slightly Wounded
Captain W Dowson 6th Dragoons Severely Wounded not dangerously [Died]

 

5th Division Return of Killed, Wounded & Missing 22 July 1812[15]

  Colonels Lieutenant Colonels Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File
Corps Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing Killed Wounded Missing
1st Foot (Royals)         1           1     5     1         1 7     2   22 120  
9th Foot                           1                 2         3 40  
38th Foot 1st Battalion         1         1 3   1 3     5           1         14 114  
38th Foot 2nd Battalion                           1     1           2         9 38  
4th Foot 1st Battalion               1                             1           16  
4th Foot 2nd Battalion                                             2         2 21 6
30th Foot                                             1         3 21 1
44th Foot                   1           1             2     1   4 20  
Brunswick Light Infantry                     1                       1     1     24 1
British Total         2     1   2 5   1 10   1 7         1 19     4   57 414 8
3rd Regiment of the Line Portuguese                                 1           3         17 49 20
15th Regiment of the Line Portuguese                         1 1   1 1                     12 59  
8th Cacadores               1     1           1           2 1         24  
Portuguese Total               1     1   1 1   1 3           5 1       29 109 20
Total         2     2   2 6   2 11   2 10         1 24 1   4   86 583 28

 

George Berkeley, Lieutenant Colonel AAG 5th Division

Total 37 Officers Killed & Wounded, 727 Sergeants & Rank & File &c

 

The army now began to march towards Madrid, which the French abandoned.

To Mrs Pringle, 16 Manchester Street, Manchester Square, London – readdressed to 11 Artillery Place[16], Brighton.

Alba de Tormes, 23 July 1812

I write you these few lines my adored Harriet in hopes of being able to send them with Lord Wellington’s dispatches, to tell you that I am perfectly well & have escaped unhurt from a severe & bloody action we had yesterday, in which my brigade was much engaged. The action took place near Salamanca, to which place we had retired from our former position & ended most gloriously for us, in the entire rout of the French, who now I think will be quiet for some time, you must look to the Gazette for particulars. From General Leith being wounded early in the action, I succeeded to the command of the division & I have reason to hope Lord Wellington was satisfied with it. The fortunes de la guerre were particularly favourable to me, as I had some narrow escapes, my horse was shot under me, in seven places & my sword shot from my side, without my being in the least hurt. Your bay has met with an honourable death in the field of battle, but I cannot tell you how much I regret the poor animal, both from being your property & from the suffering & exertions she made for me. After having her eyes shot out & seven bullets in different parts of her body, she continued to carry me for near an hour, before she died, at a time I could not get another horse & it was impossible to do without one. My brigade took an eagle, among other trophy’s from the French & I was very well satisfied with their conduct. If you should see Lord Chatham tell him his two battalions[17] behaved extremely well & fortunately have not but with much loss.

Cole is wounded, but slightly[18], General Beresford wounded[19], & General Le Marchant killed[20], but I have not yet heard the return of the casualties. I shall write to you more fully in a few days, but you may be now perfectly at ease, as the French have got such a drubbing, they are retiring as fast as they can. Your two dear letters of the 25th and 29th have reached me a few days ago, when we were drawn out in the field close opposite the enemy & gave me a pleasure in reading every expression of your tender affection, which I cannot describe. Indeed, my darling Harriet you are the happiness of my life & every day makes you still dearer to my heart. You shall hear again from me soon & I entreat you to be perfectly at ease about me now as the French are retiring entirely & there is every chance of our being quiet for a long time, God bless you my darling love, believe me ever most affectionately yours, give my love to the dear children & I am for ever, your faithful & affectionate husband. WH Pringle.

Camp 23 July, Alva Tormes [Alba de Tormes]

Sir,

I have the honour to report to you the conduct of the 2nd Brigade 5th Division in the action of the 22nd instant.

It must be in your recollection, the very steady manner in which it advanced under a heavy fire of round and grape to within twenty paces of the enemy’s columns which had for some time opened a heavy fire of musketry. The brigade reserved its fire until this moment when pouring in a well-directed fire along the line, instantly advanced to the charge in double quick time, broke the enemy’s columns in every direction & pursued them at the point of the bayonet for some distance until ordered to halt. During the whole of this time I cannot too much praise the conduct of the officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates of the brigade for their gallant and steady conduct. I particularly wish to mention Major Piper commanding the 1st Battalion & 2nd Battalion 4th Regiment[21], Lt Colonel Hamilton 30th[22], Lt Colonel Harding 44th Regiment, and Captain Anwyll 4th Regiment acting Brigade Major[23]. I also wish you to notice the gallant conduct of Major Faunce[24] with the light companies which were detached during the day.

I also beg to notice that the 4th Regiment has taken the colour of the 62nd Legere, this being the second time within four months it has taken the colours of two different regiments. The 44th have also taken an eagle[25] & the 30th the tall colour of the 62nd Legere, the light regiments always carry small flags. I have the honour to be, your obedient servant, James Brooker Lieutenant Colonel 4th Regiment, commanding the 2nd Brigade, 5th Division[26].

I beg to state that in the manner of officers I have forgot to mention Major Williamson 4th Regiment 2nd Battalion[27].

 

To Major General Pringle commanding 5th Division

Undated

Sir,

As you this morning requested me to send you the names of any officer of the regiment under my command, who distinguished himself in the action yesterday. I beg leave to say that every officer in the battalion gallantly exerted themselves for the good of the service, but it is only justice due to Captain Bamford[28] who for nearly the last year has been second in command of the regiment and consequently doing field officers duty and who part of that time commanded the regiment, especially at the storming of Badajoz. To say, that he rendered me the greatest assistance in the field yesterday, as he has done at all times and I humbly hope that his excellency the Earl of Wellington will be pleased to recommend him for promotion. Captain Bamford has been a captain in the regiment for nearly nine years, and I understand was strongly recommended to the commander of the forces, Lieutenant Colonel Brooke who commanded the brigade and Major General Leith for his conduct in commanding the regiment at Badajoz. I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient humble servant, A. Hamilton, Lieutenant Colonel commanding 2nd Battalion 38th.

To Major General Pringle

Camp near Alba de Tormes

23rd July 1812

Sir,

I beg of you to present to His Excellency commander of the forces, an Eagle taken from the enemy by the 44th Regiment in the vigorous charges we made upon them yesterday. At the same time, I have to mention that it was the good fortune of the light company commanded by Captain Ballard[29] to secure it and he assures me it was first seized upon by his subaltern Lieutenant Pearce[30].

In reporting to you the gallant conduct of the 44th Regiment under my command, I have to say that it called forth the most flattering marks of your approbation on the field of battle. To this I have only to add to their conduct excited my admiration as it did your applause and I am sure you will mention them as they deserve. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient servant, George Harding Major, Lieutenant Colonel[31] commanding 2nd Battalion 44th Regiment.

To Major General Pringle

24th July 1812

Sir,

I beg to mention to you that I commanded the light companies of the 2nd Battalion 4th, 30th and 44th Regiments which formed the right of the first line when we advanced and drove the enemy from their position and my own company being on the right of all, took an eagle, which is in the possession of my subaltern Lieutenant Pearce. Your favourable report of this circumstance will do me much service and forward my views in the army.

Brigade Major Anwyll communicated your orders to me in the field and I trust that I conducted myself to your satisfaction. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient servant, Thomas Ballard, Captain 44th.

To Major General Pringle, 5th Division

Cuellar, 2 August 1812,

Sir,

Having laid your letter of the 1st instant with its enclosures from Major Williamson of the 4th Foot before Lord Wellington, I am directed to request that you will desire the Paymaster of the 2nd Battalion[32] of that regiment to wait immediately upon the Deputy Paymaster General[33] at this place, to receive a fortnight’s subsistence. I have the honour to be Sir, your obedient servant, Fitzroy Somerset Military Secretary

The general begs this letter may be acted upon immediately. A copy of it to be kept by Major Williamson, and the original returned the first convenient opportunity. GD Willson ADC[34]

 

To Mrs Pringle, 16 Manchester Street, Manchester square, London – forwarded to Brighton,

Camp on the Lisa 2 August 1812

Since I last wrote to you my adored Harriet, on the 23rd of July, from Alba de Tormes, then has nothing new whatever occurred to our army, the French army has been retreating with the greatest haste & confusion & we have been in pursuit of them, without however any part of our army, except the cavalry, coming up with them, they are now gone towards Burgos & we are now marching towards Segovia, to prevent the junction of Joseph Bonaparte from Madrid, with the debris of Marmont’s army. As you will have seen the details of the battle of the 22nd of July, in the papers before you get this, I shall not dwell on them. I believe the consequences have been more advantageous to us than was at first expected. If, however they do not excite the Spaniards to make greater exertions than they have done, or seem inclined to do. I really fear all our sacrifices will be thrown away. The distress of the troops has become quite alarming, my brigade is reduced one third since I joined them & I am sure the rest of the army suffer equally. We have marched every day but one since I last wrote & the heat of the weather brought on an attack of bowel complaint which lasted for two days, but which now I have perfectly got rid of & am quite stout again. I take every care of myself I can, but the sun is extremely hot, & the mornings before daylight very cold, which is very oft to disagree with everybody & I have been lucky in not having been obliged to be in camp above three times, except when we were quite close to the French & the accommodation in the Spanish villages is generally very comfortable, the smallest houses extremely clean, quite the reverse of the Portuguese. We are likely I believe to march about a good deal, but except that, I think there is not the least chance of anything being done for some time at least, indeed I am convinced that there never was a battle less expected, or less intended by either of the generals commanding than the last, but I believe the fact is, that Lord Wellington suffered himself to be out-manoeuvred by Marmont at first, which obliged him to leave his position on the Douro & retire on Salamanca, & Marmont then thought he would take any liberty with us & went as far. Lord W[ellington] was obliged to attack him, so Marmont has only to thank himself for all that has happened to him. I cannot help every day reflecting the loss of your poor horse, she had grown much further since she came to this country & was in such fine condition, that she was admired by the whole army, indeed I do not think there was such a horse here. The only consideration I can give you, is that she was so much taller than any other of my horses & carried her head so high, that I am sure had I rode any other, I should have got two or three bullets in my body, which the poor horse received in her head & neck. I trust my darling love that you are this month at Tunbridge & find all the benefit you expected from the waters & often wish I could see you for five minutes, it would reconcile me to any hardships & we have been moving so fast about, no letters come up to the army, since yours of the 1st of July. I trust however, a day or two will bring me some news of you, the longer I am absent from you, the more anxiety I feel for you, the more I feel all the happiness of my life is centred in you. I fear you will scarcely be able to make out this letter but the wind blows everything about in my tent & I don’t like to defer for a day writing, lest I might be too late for the mail, I generally send my letter to Lord Charles Manners[35] To send with the dispatches, I hope my Harriet your dear young arrivals are quite well, when you next write, be very particular in your account of them & your dear self. You cannot know with what anxiety I want the arrival of your letter, to hear everything that relates to you, I trust my love you take every care of yourself for my sake, for you well know how totally my happiness depends on you. God bless you my Harriett, believe me ever most faithfully & fondly W Pringle.

Sir Stapleton Cotton is wounded in the arm, rather badly, but will not lose his arm, Cot is doing well.[36]

After proceeding to Madrid with the army, Pringle found the division ordered to the north.

Arevalo

3 September 1812

A thousand thanks to you my adored Harriet for your dear letter of the 3rd of August, which I found here, on my arrival two days ago, from Madrid. I find myself considerably better in every respect, since I set out from there, I have got rid of the ague & my appetite has returned & I gain strength every day. The change of climate from the intense heat of Madrid, to a very cool moderate situation, has been of the greatest service to me & I hope in a few days to be as well as ever. I am most happy to hear my Harriett, that you find yourself better & I trust your continuance at Tunbridge for a little longer than you intended will be of service to you. I am sorry the Nevilles could not receive you at the time they first proposed, as I think it would have been pleasanter for you, but I entreat my Harriett, you will not make yourself uneasy about being obliged to be at a little more expense, than you had intended. I am confident my love, that you are at no expense which can be avoided & your health & comfort are the first objects to me. Indeed, I should be miserable, if I thought you neglected doing whatever conduced to either. I trust your income will enable you to get on & that is all I care about. The 16th of last month there should have been a large payment made at Messr Wrights[37] for us, anything I can scrape together, you may be assured I shall remit them, but the expense of fitting out at first, & my bad fortune in losing horse & mules, make me fear, for some time, I shall have little opportunity of doing so. I thank you from my heart my Harriett, for your wishes for my happiness, but believe me my love my only prospects of happiness, are my return to you. Since I left you, I have never enjoyed one moments happiness, the constant occupation & the seeing places I had never seen before, occupy my mind to a certain degree, but my only prospect & hope of happiness is in my return to you, which I trust will happen before very long. I fear you will have been kept a long time in anxiety & suspense from the reports of the action of the 22nd of July, for I see by my paper that the report reached England on the 5th of August without any particulars & I am sure Lord Wellington’s dispatches could not arrive for at least as much after, however I trust you will never make yourself uneasy, about newspaper reports, for I can assure you, that 9 out of 10 of them, are totally false. The troops are in cantonments about here to rest & to try to get them a little more healthy, but I am sorry to say they are extremely sickly, my brigade has suffered much from sickness, particularly the 2nd battalion of the 4th which landed under three months ago, 900 men strong & are not now 300 fit for duty. The chestnut horse has got a great deal better, so that I am able to ride her. This time of year, makes me think of poor Walton[38] & your riding out shooting with me. I cannot cease regretting your poor boy more, I am sure I never shall have such another, I am very glad A Wright likes the Waltons, he behaved most liberally in all our transactions about the plan, & I was most fortunate in finding such a person to deal with & I am convinced you never could have lived then by yourself. I have got a tolerable quarter in this town, which is a large old town & I hope in a day or two to go out shooting a little, which I have been so much accustomed to at this time of year, that I think it will do me good. Flint and Pluto are very well & very good travellers. I am glad you have been sent a map of Spain, you will see Arevalo on the road from Madrid to Valladolid, about twenty miles from Madrid. I wrote to you every post from there, which I hope you will receive regularly. I get all your dear letters without any mistake, they are my greatest comfort.  I get The Globe[39] very regularly, which is a great resource, give my love to the children & believe me my own Harriett your ever faithful & affectionate husband. WHP

Torrequemada[40] 14 September 1812

To Mrs Pringle, 16 Manchester Street, Manchester Square, London.

Ten thousand thanks to you my beloved Harriet for your two dear letters of the 24th & 25th which I have just received & I have also to thank you my Harriet for yours of the 17th & 19th, which I received together, indeed my darling love, I cannot express to you how sensible I am of all these marks of your kind affection, but believe me, they are deeply lodged in my heart, which while extant, will never cease to adore you. I am very sorry you have felt so uneasy about me, but I can now with truth assure you that I am quite well, you know I always told you strictly everything that concerned me, therefore you may always put implicit confidence in the reports I make you of myself. The change of air & the weather getting cooler has quite re-established my health & I now feel no bad effects whatever from my former illness; I am very sorry to say poor Hulse[41] is dead, both he & General Wheatley[42] died of the same kind of fever I had at Madrid, but mine luckily took the turn of the ague, which is the most favourable termination it can have. Your letters my love all arrive perfectly safe through the Secretary of State’s office & I think you need never mind writing on any day in the week you like, as there are often despatches coming & at all events they take care of the letters hearing frequently & regularly from you is literally my own happiness in this country. We are now moving from Valladolid to Burgos, but we go on very slowly, for we are waiting for some Spaniards to come up with us & they are as usual some days behind what they promised, in their time. What part of the French army were here, have retired rapidly & will go I believe behind the Ebro & I hope we shall soon return again, towards the south, for this country has been so plundered & destroyed by the French, there is very bad accommodation in everything. I have had a very kind letter from Lord Chatham dated the 18th, but it was sent by a private hand, which made it much longer in coming. I shall write to him from Burgos. I thank you my Harriet, for your particular account of your health, I assure you my love, nothing interests me so much as every particular in which relates to you & I request you will continue to give me a minute account of yourself in every particular. I am happy to receive a more favourable account from you than I have done & I trust the warm bath at Brighton will make you quite stout again. I had a long letter from John Wright last mail, he gives a very bad account of his wife, who I fear there is little hope of her recovery. He says his brother [likes the?] Waltons very much, but there is an attempt to take the Charter house manor from him, which he thinks will succeed, probably instigated by Mr Darell, he mentions your intending to make them a visit which I hope you will be able to do. I am very glad to hear Lady Eliot was civil, as I think it much better to make good terms with such near connections & I perfectly agree with you, that it is much better you not being there, at the same time with Mrs E, for it would in all probability expose you to some awkward situation. The Somers’ are always kind & civil. Seen a good deal of Charles Cocks, whom I like very much. I am glad to hear you get my letters regularly, I write by every mail & every opportunity, but sometimes when I am a distance from headquarters there may be some irregularity in the letters going, therefore you must never make yourself uneasy, should you not hear every mail from me. It is a great comfort in this army; getting our letters & papers so regularly & am glad to hear the young animals are so well & I trust I shall soon hear the same favourable report of your dear self. Believe me you are, as you ever have been, my own fine creature, in whom every thought & wish of my heart is centred. Farewell my beloved wife, God bless you, give my love to the dear children & believe me your ever faithful & affectionate husband. WH Pringle

Soto Palacios

 

Pampliega[43]

16 September 1812

In case the enemy should remain in the position he now occupies, he will be attacked in the morning.

Major General Clinton[44] will move the 6th Division by the left with its guns into the valley leading Villaldemiro, the village now occupied by the Brigadier General Pack’s Brigade to Tamaron, taking care that the rear of the division is concealed in the valley before the enemy can perceive their movement.

Major General Clinton will ascend the heights from Tamaron and will direct his march upon Hornillas del Camino and he will receive further orders from the commander of the forces for descending the heights & for passing the River Hormaza [Hormazuela]. If the enemy should not be in force on these points, Major General Clinton will secure the passage of the Hormaza and wait for further orders.

Major General Anson[45] will send two squadrons of his brigade with Major General Clinton. Brigadier General Pack[46] will be with his brigade at the back of the heights forming the right of the valley of Tamaron from the entrance at daylight, and when General Clinton will ascend the heights, he will turn the enemy’s right and will drive their party’s from the ground which they occupy. He is to keep the communication with Major General Clinton and will receive further orders for descending the heights and his ulterior movements.

Colonel Stirling’s[47] Brigade of the 1st Division are to relieve General Pack’s before the enemy can see and the light infantry of that brigade, the posts of the 4th Cacadores. The 1st and 5th Divisions are to be formed in columns of battalions on the plain between the high road to Burgos and Villaldemiro with the left in front, their right being on the high road, in front of the camp of the 6th Division a little after daylight.

The 7th Division and one Spanish Division to be formed in a similar manner at the same time in their rear, the Spanish Division on the left with their left in front, the 7th Division on the right with their right in front.

Two squadrons of the 11th[48] are to join their brigade, leaving only one squadron on the left of the Arlanzon. Major General Anson’s to be formed where it is at present situated, Colonel Ponsonby’s[49], Major General Bock’s Brigades[50] with the exception of one squadron of the latter and the Spanish cavalry to be formed in columns of regiments in rear of the infantry. The heavy and reserve artillery to be in readiness to move forward on the high road. Brigadier General Bradford is to ascend the heights on the right of Torrepadierna with his brigade and is to turn the left of the enemy by the hills.

Colonel Delancey will instruct him regarding the route he is to follow and Brigadier General Bradford is not to begin his movement till he will see the troops in motion in the centre. One squadron of the 11th and one squadron of Major General Bock’s Brigade and the cavalry under Don Julian are to attend the movements of Brigadier General Bradford’s Brigade.

One division of Spanish infantry are to support Brigadier General Bradford[51] and are to be posted by Colonel Delancey on the heights near Pampleiga so as to cover the bridge of the latter place.

The baggage is to be collected behind Vila Nueva de Cantar [Las Carretas] and that on the left of the Arlanzon, is to pass the bridge of Pampleiga in the following order, namely,

That of the 5th Division

Of the 7th Division

Of Headquarters

Of 11th Light Dragoons

Of Brigadier General Bradford’s Brigade

Of the regiment of German Dragoons

The 4th and 38th will join their respective divisions

 

Undated [September 1812]

¼ before 3 pm

Let me know if you should hear any more of the movement of the enemy towards Rioseras[52]. W[ellington]

 

The siege of Burgos began on 19 September.

G[eneral] O[rder] 19 September 1812

A working part of 300 men of the 1st Division is to parade this afternoon at six o’clock, between the hill on which the enemy work is situated & the round hill, to be under the directions of Colonel Burgoyne[53].

A working party of 300 men of the 5th Division to parade at the same place at three o’clock this afternoon, to be employed under Colonel Burgoyne on making facines[54] and gabions[55].

3 non c[ommissioned] officers & 24 carpenters & 29 masons from 1st Division to attend Colonel Burgoyne tomorrow morning at daylight. He will send for them.

 

To Mrs Pringle, 16 Manchester Street, Manchester Square, London

Near Burgos, 20 September 1812

This is your dear birthday my own Harriet & from my heart & soul I wish you many & happy returns of it. I ardently wish I was with you to enjoy it with you, but I think your next, we shall celebrate together. I have been here three days & our division is encamped close to the suburbs of Burgos & all the army which came up with Lord Wellington. The French army has retired towards the Ebro, which since they will probably pass, as they are not in a condition to oppose us here & our army will stop here till they have taken the castle & fort, which are in possession of the French. The taking them is an operation, in which general officers are not at all concerned, therefore I am quite a spectator of what is going forward, they appear to be very strong & I fear our means are not adequate to reduce them, without much trouble. However Lord Wellington has been very fortunate & I hope the same good luck may attend him in his operations here, we go into the town, but there is but little to be got there, as the inhabitants have in general left their houses. The outworks to the castle were taken by storm the night after we came & Charles Cocks commanded the light company’s which led the attack, he was almost the only officer who escaped unhurt & has gained great credit for his conduct on this occasion, he is a very fine young man & will I hope get the rank of Lieutenant Colonel for this business. I have to thank you my beloved Harriet for your letter of the 31st, which I got some days ago, it came wonderfully quick but I believe it came by a king’s messenger with Lord Wellington’s despatches as no papers have yet arrived to that date, it is a great advantage sending your letters through the office. I am now perfectly well & stout again, the climate here is cool & much like that of England & after this time of year the unhealthy season is over. I should like after our operations here are over, to return to the southward, but I fancy our movements must depend on the French, I now begin to have great hopes that if things go on well in Russia, they will be obliged to abandon Spain & then I hope the army will get home. Sir E Paget[56] is I hear arrived at Lisbon & some other general officers indeed the late deaths & losses, make a fresh supply of generals necessary. I feel much the loss of Hulse & Wheatley, we were the same standing & served much together. I am anxious to hear how John Wright’s wife gets over her accouchment[57], I shall thank you to let me know when you hear.

Burgos is a handsome town & I think the handsomest cathedral in Spain in it, I hope it may not suffer from any of the shots against the castle. We have got part of the Spanish army here with us, they are a sad looking set, dressed in all colours & will I think want some English officers among them, as the Portuguese have had, to make them good for anything. I am anxious to hear my love how the warm bathing agrees with you. I trust it will strengthen you & restore your health entirely, you must take the greatest care against cold in the winter & wear flannel constantly. I have been obliged to wear flannel next my skin, which at first annoyed me extremely, but I have got reconciled to it & I am sure it is a good thing in this country. I am happy to hear so good an account of the children & I trust I shall soon hear as good a one of your dear self. When you go to Audley End[58], I suppose you will make a visit to Waltons. Pray remember me to Old Hall &c &c, I should like to take a walk round the park with you, my Harriet, as we have so often done together. If they should make any enquiry about the boy who came with me from there, he is going on very well & likely to make a decent servant. I have got a tolerably comfortable house here, indeed I generally manage to get some place better than a tent & the nights now begin to be cold in camp, my horses go on pretty well, the chestnut mare is sound enough for me to ride, do you keep the job horses on for the year or not. I hope soon to hear again from you my Harriet, for your dear letters are my only comfort. Give my love to the young animals & believe me my beloved Harriet, your ever faithful & affectionate WH Pringle.

To Lieutenant Colonel the Honourable C J Greville, commanding 1st Brigade[59].

Burgos, 21 September 1812

Sir,

I have the honour to transmit the enclosed which I received yesterday from Surgeon Donahoe 2nd Battalion 38th Regiment and beg leave to detail minutes of the transaction alluded to.

On the evening of the 17th last when encamped on the heights near Gomies I desired the surgeon to procure a house for the sick of the battalion as from the inclemence of the weather they had increased considerably. To this he answered on the most peremptory manner that he would not. I shortly after directed that he would accompany them to the village, where he would find room in a house where the sick of the 9th Regiment were, or next down from it. He replied in very forcible terms, he would not unless I sent a man to point it out. Being late I gave directions to his poor commanding officer where he would find a house, on which Surgeon Donahoe said he would not go, adding in a manner highly disrespectful, imperious, and extremely loud and violent, that he now saw through my conduct which had for its object, offensive only particularly towards himself and advancing, said ‘now sir, let me tell you your duty as commanding officer of the regiment, the particulars of which I shall not now trouble you with.

I made immediate application to the service medical officer of the division for an assistant surgeon to attend the sick of the battalion, in order that I might place Surgeon Donahoe in arrest. This I could not obtain, which induced me from the existing circumstances to postpone the business to a more favourable opportunity.

I omitted before to state with respect to that part of Surgeon Donahoe’s complaint relative to my ordering a guard. I did from the circumstances above detailed, feel it my duty to desire the adjutant to send for a sergeant and four men to carry my orders into execution.

I regret Surgeon Donahoe’s conduct should render this measure necessary and the he should still continue unconscious of his error and the evils resulting from disobedience of orders. I have the honour to be Sir, your most obedient humble servant, John Nugent Lieutenant Colonel 2nd Battalion 38th Regiment.

To Major General Pringle

Rubena, 19 October 1812

½ past 10 am

Dear Sir,

Major General Anson has informed me that he has sent Captain Childers[60] squadron of the 11th Light Dragoons to your front & I shall be obliged to you if you will let me know whether you have received any intelligence from him of the enemy’s movements this morning.

If you have not communicated with Captain Childers, you will as well, send an officer to him. You will find him probably on the road from [Las] Muaradas  towards Caborredondo.

I shall likewise be much obliged to you if you will let me know whether you have received any intelligence this morning from the officer commanding the Spanish cavalry [at] Rioseras.

If you have not, you should send them.

Ever yours, most faithfully

Wellingtona

Burgos Castle

 

To the Marquis Wellington

5th Division – Return of killed and wounded and Missing of Major General Pringle’s Brigade from the 21st to 26th October 1812 inclusive. [The siege of Burgos had been abandoned on 21 October and Wellington’s troops began the long march back to the Portuguese frontier]

Missing on the 21st Occasion Missing on the 22nd Occasion Missing on the 23rd Occasion Missing on the 24th Occasion Missing on the 25th Occasion Killed on the 25th October Wounded on 25th October Missing on the 26th Occasion Total
Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Field Officers Captains

 

Subalterns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Field Officers Captains

 

Subalterns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Sergeants Drummers Rank & File  
1st Battalion

4th Regiment

1 1 3 12 2 3 1 4 1 1 2 1 40 10 84
2nd Battalion

4th Regiment

1 3 1 5 1 13 1 1 17 1 1 4 5 54
2nd Battalion

30th Regiment

2 1 2 1 7 8 10 2 2 1 6 2 23 67
2nd Battalion

44th Regiment

1 2 1 7 3 1 4 1 1 1 1 2 2 20 47
Brunswick

Light Infantry

1 3 5 1 1 1 2 1 15
Total 2 9 2 4 17 1 1 38 1 15 1 35 2 4 9 2 2 9 7 1 89 16 267

 

Names of Officers wounded on 25th October 1812

[Villa Muriel]

Names of Officers Killed on the 25th October 1812
Regiment Names Wounded
1st Battalion 4th Regiment Lieutenant Colonel J Piper

Lieutenant W Edgell

Slightly

Severely

2nd 44th Lieutenant W Lennon

Brunswick Light Infantry Lieutenant C Hartwig

30th Regiment Captain J Hitchen

Lieutenant M Andrews

Lieutenant J Rumley

Lieutenant G Brisac

Ensign H Beere

Ensign F Tincombe

Ensign G Modden

Slightly

Slightly

Severely

Slightly

Slightly

Slightly

Severely

44th Regiment Lieutenant Colonel G Harding

Lieutenant H Elwin

Ensign M Smith

Captain D Donahue

 

 

 

Severely

 

 

Elley[61]

To Major General Oswald[62]

Cabezon 27th October 1812

Sir,

As my brigade was detached from you on the 25th & was a good deal engaged, I think it right to impart to you the occurrences of that day. My brigade, with the exception of one regiment (the 2nd Battalion of the 4th) which was sent up the hill by you, was posted to defend the passage of the bridge at Villa Muriel, the 9th Regiment also with the piquets of the Royals & 38th were also under my command to defend the passage of the fords near the bridge & before your arrival in the morning I had detached the cacadores from the Portuguese brigade to defend the ford near the hill, these troops continued to defend the different posts allotted to them for above four hours. About 2 o’clock I was informed that the cacadores were obliged to retire from the fords near the hill, by the enemy’s cavalry having crossed the river lower down & having come on their flank in force. In consequence of this movement our right flank was left totally unprotected & the enemy had already got in rear of the village before I was made acquainted with the circumstance of the cacadores having retired. I was therefore obliged to withdraw the troops in the village up the hill & I am happy to acquaint you that they retired in the most perfect order, under a very heavy fire of musketry & artillery, the cacadores also retired in very good order & I enclose Major Hill’s report which has detailed the circumstances of his corps retiring. As the advance against the enemy afterwards & their repulse from the village was under your own eye, I need not add anything on that subject, but to assure you that the conduct of every officer & man under my command was such as to merit my highest approbation & I must beg to call your observation, for the information of the commander of the forces, the gallant conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Brooke commanding the 1st Battalion of the 4th Regiment, Lieutenant Colonel Hamilton commanding the 30th Regiment, Lieutenant Colonel Harding (who was wounded early in the action) commanding the 44th Regiment & of Captain Guthrie[63] who succeeded to the command of the regiment on Colonel Harding being obliged to leave the field & I must also beg to mention to you the very gallant conduct of the 9th Regiment under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Crawford[64], who also commanded the piquets of the 1st Brigade & who were engaged during the whole of the day & expelled every attempt of the enemy to cross the fords. Lieutenant Hulsen[65] of the Brunswick Light Infantry also particularly distinguished himself & was the only officer of that corps with us who was not killed or wounded. I received every assistance from my brigade major & my aide de camp during the day. I have the honour to be your very obedient servant, Major General WH Pringle.

To Major General Pringle

Rueda, 30th November 1812

Sir,

I have laid before the Marquis of Wellington your letter of the 13th instant, containing the certificates of Captain Chambers & Lieutenant Rumley of the 30th Regiment of the capture of the publick mules of the companies they command by the enemy near Villa Muriel.

Warrants will be granted for these losses on my receiving proper certificates in duplicate: and on their being paid, you will be pleased to see that the mules are replaced.

The commander of the forces however cannot authorise Lieutenant Rumley to receive compensation for the loss of money which he had on the camp kettle mules, it being perfectly counter to orders his having that money upon the animal. It will however be necessary that Lieutenant Rumley should provide the sum of which the company has thus been deprived. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient servant, Fitzroy Somerset, Military Secretary.

The troops took up Winter Quarters in Portugal

Effective State of the 2nd Brigade   Lamego 15 December 1812

  Present   Effective         Sick   in   cantonments  
 

 

Corps

              Field Officers Captains     Subalterns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Field

Officers

      Captains Subalterns Staff        Sergeants Drummers Rank & File
1st Battalion 4th Foot 2 5 20 5 36 6 282 1 6
2nd Battalion 4th Foot 2 5 20 2 28 7 223 1 1 20
30th Foot 1 5 13 5 24 10 193 10
44th Foot 3 11 4 15 8 140 6
47th Foot 1 3 10 2 34 16 380 2 22
B[rigade] L[ight]  I[nfantry]  

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Total 6 21 76 18 140 47 1248 1 3 1 65
Sick sent to the rear
Joined From sick absent 3
On command 31 6 87
Sick absent 62 32 1535

 

R Anwyll Brigade Major

 

It would seem that William Pringle returned home in January 1813 and then returned to Portugal at the end of May 1813. No reason has been established for this absence, although it is clear that he believed that he would not miss any of the fighting season. On returning to Portugal he wrote a number of letters from Lisbon before undertaking the long march to rejoin the army. He now learnt that Wellington’s forces were advancing into Spain once more.

 

To Mrs Pringle, 56 Grosvenor Street, London.

Lisbon, Sunday 30th May 1813

Although I wrote to you yesterday my beloved Harriet, I cannot help writing again today, to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 18th, which is the only letter I have got from you, since I left England. The contents have made me very uneasy, as I find from them that you have been unwell & not having received any firm intelligence from you, leaves me quite in the dark as to the circumstance of your illness, however thank God you now tell me you are doing pretty well, I trust my darling love you are so & that your next letter will confirm it to me. I really am very unhappy about you, but I am sure you will take the greatest care of yourself for my sake. I think you know how dear you are to me, how totally the happiness of my life depends on you & you will not I entreat you, give way to depression of spirits, for I know if you do, it will prey on your health. I have only this moment got your letter & I trust you will get this regularly, for though the mail is made up at the Post Office I have sent to Sir Charles Stuart (the minister here) to beg he will send this with his dispatches. I fear much my love you will be uneasy at being so long without hearing from you, but I assure you I am perfectly well & not the least return of ague or any complaint. Be so good, my Harriet, in reply to this to give me a full account of your indisposition, in case by any accident, your former letters should not reach me. I sometimes think you may have had a proper cough, but I am most anxious to know all about you. When you get this, I will thank you, to write a note to John Wright & desire him to tell his clerk who wrote to the Post Office about my newspapers, to write again, to say that there has been some mistake about their sending them to me, as some for me have arrived here, except one paper of the 1st of May which was the day from which I ordered them & to beg that they will send them regularly in future, for it is the greatest disappointment not getting them. I am sorry to hear Hunter has been ill, for it must be a great inconvenience to you. My servant goes on pretty well, he is honest & sober, but quite unused to the kind of hurry one always is in, in this country, however I hope to get through the summer with him & after that I trust I shall not want him. I have not heard anything of Lord Wellington’s intentions. The army has moved towards the Douro, but from all I can learn there is little chance of much to do this campaign. I hope the news from Germany may not turn out so bad as it appears from the French account. I am glad you lent that poor Mr Enery that money, but I should not continue to do, if he renews his applications. I hope my Harriet your speaking to Lord Eliot, will not annoy you, what makes me so anxious to get some addition to enable us to live together, in from feeling so strongly I never can enjoy a moments happiness when separated from you, every time I part from you, I feel it still stronger. I trust my Harriet, we shall meet again in winter & not be obliged to part again. I shall be most happy to get away from here, the occupation of marching & moving about, takes up my thoughts & prevents my being so low as I feel now. I had a letter from Gilmour to tell me of his change of plan, which I am sure will be for his advantage. Heaven bless you my beloved wife, I shall be most anxious till I hear from you again, but I fear I shall not before I leave Lisbon, believe me for ever yours WH Pringle

To Mrs Pringle, 6 Lower Grosvenor Street, London

Lisbon, Saturday 5 June 1813

I again have to send a letter from Lisbon, my beloved Harriet, indeed I have met with so many delays, that I fear I shall hardly get away from here before the end of next week, my only consolation is I have some hopes I may get a letter from you, before I leave Lisbon & indeed my love, even you can scarcely believe with what anxiety, I wait to receive some intelligence which can clear up all my doubt & fears about your health. I hope in God I shall ere long get a good account, for I feel very unhappy about you, I never felt more low, than since my last arrival at Lisbon & now I feel those little grievances, which we all wrest with, annoy me & irritate me much more than they used to, the more I am separated from you my Harriet, the more I feel I cannot be happy but with you. I always find your kind & soothing attentions a relief from those vexations we must sometimes all feel. I have not yet had a letter from Lord Wellington, which I wait for before I leave Lisbon. The army are moving about but I do not understand that there is much chance of anything to be done. I rather dread the length of the journey, it will probably take me a month to get up to my division, after I go from here. However, I am perfectly well & the weather is much cooler than usual at this time of the year. I have been greatly annoyed with the servant I took from London with me, his health is now bad & I have reason to believe that he is & has been in the constant habit of drinking, he is so totally useless & unequal to going up the country with me, that I must part with him here, which is a sad grievance. I have heard of a servant who has just left Arthur Upton[66], who I think of taking, but the sending this man home & taking another who will cost me more, is very expensive & I grudge anything I spend away from you, my horses are well & in good condition, the grey I bought last, promises to turn out very well & the filly is becoming quite quiet, she will be very handsome & a very good goer, so if Leon[67] brings her back she may probably do for your riding. I hope my love you are tolerably comfortable in Grosvenor Street.  Pray when you write, tell me everything you do & all about your dear self & what your plans [are] for the summer and if your health admits I should think going to Port Eliot the most desirable & I beg without consulting me, you will do whatever you think best, about Georgy going to school. I trust my Harriet that we shall not be obliged to be separated again, another year. I have no news at all to tell you from here. Lisbon is I think even more trite than it was last year. I have got a cook though not so good a one as my last, but I hope less expensive. I wrote twice by the last mail to you & I shall write again before I leave Lisbon. On the march, I may not be able to write as regularly as I should write, so that you must impute it to that cause, if you are longer than usual without hearing. Mr Dawson[68], who Lady Ely[69] was enquiring after, is now here & is rather a wild one. God bless you my adored Harriet, give my love to the dear children & believe me your ever faithful & affectionate husband WH Pringle

Gagolas [Gallegos?] 15 July 1813

To Dr McGregor[70]

Private & confidential

My dear Sir,

I am addressing you upon a delicate subject, and on one of considerable importance, to myself & my motive for so doing is to enable you to satisfy Lord Wellington (in case he should apply to you) of the necessity of my giving up for the present the command of my division and of proceeding to England. While I was at Portsmouth waiting for a fair wind in the beginning of April, I was seized with a fever, which confined me for a fortnight. As soon as the fever left me I reported myself ready to sail, trusting to the change of air & quiet at sea during the fair season, to complete my recovery. I landed in Lisbon in the head of May, after a month’s passage, free from any symptoms of disease but still weak. I left Lisbon on the 3rd of June & on my way to join the army I had two slight attacks of ague, these were not however sufficient to delay me a single day, but when I had completed the journey, which I had effected on the 22nd of June, I had a very smart attack of fever. This subsided to the medicine which Staff Surgeon Cole[71] prescribed & I continued well though weak & at times experiencing lassitude to a distressing degree until within this last week, when after a slight bowel complaint, I experienced another severe attack of fever, this left me in the course of a few hours. On the following morning, the 18th, I took a considerable quantity of bark, notwithstanding which, the fever returned after an interval of about 18 hours, this continued through that night & I was and continue to be very much weakened by it. I have lost my appetite & pass restless nights. These circumstances you will readily believe, have disabled me for the present performance of any duty. I believe however the fever to have had course & I think that after a few days of rest, by the care of bark, I should shortly be able to resume the command of my division; for I have unfortunately met with an accident, God knows how, which renders rest indispensable, I am not able to get on horseback, but with serious inconvenience and pain, but I feel however the strongest objection to gaining that partiality to my care which it could not fail to acquire were it to be submitted to a board. I am sensible that it is necessary for me to be a long time absent from my division as it could require for me to go to England, to affect a cure (or such a degree of amendment as would enable me discharge my duty) and to return and do all that is requisite for the attainment of this, to me, most important object, can best be put right in England if not exclusively there. My wish is to proceed there without any delay and that I have no other purpose for leaving my division & proceed south at once. I wish therefore your recommendation to proceed to England upon the grounds of general illness & not upon (not of the specific complaint under which I suffer) & I hope from the explanation I have entered into, you will pass on [to] Lord Wellington informing of this according to my wish. I am proceeding to Tortosa & shall arrive there in the morning of the 17th. If you should be within a short distance of that place I should be glad of an opportunity of seeing you & I shall be obliged to you to let me find a letter from you informing me where you are or likely to be, or likely to be, if the distance should be too great.

On the first day of the French advance to relieve Pamplona, General Pringle commanded the 2th Division as General Stewart was to the rear. Stewart wrote to Pringle regarding occurrences before his arrival, presumably in an effort to assuage any criticism.

To Major General Pringle

Burietta [Burguete[72]] 27th July 1813

Dear General,

I have had the honour of receiving your report of the proceedings on the 25th [The Action at Maya] instant & have forwarded it with mine to Sir Rowland Hill. The events of that day weigh much on my spirits & your letter has given me relief by the testimony which it bears as to the due degree of resistance which was made to the enemy’s advance previous to my arrival on the heights.

I have particularly remarked to Sir Rowland Hill the merit of Lieutenant Colonel Fenwick[73] & of the 34th Regiment upon the 25th instant & upon many occasions in which I have had the good fortune of being in action with that corps in this country. My aide de camp, Captain Le Marchant[74], has requested my sanction to his offering you his services during my temporary absence from the division. I cannot avoid the opportunity of remarking, that if you find it convenient for Le Marchant to join you during that period, no young staff officer’s services will be more valuable & no personal friend more estimable. I am recommended to go for a few days, to the rear to avoid inflammation & be soon enabled to rejoin you. In this case, Captain’s Heise[75] & Thornhill[76] remain under your command & you will find them excellent & experienced officers in their respective departments. I have the honour to be, your faithful servant, Lieutenant General W Stewart.

PS Under all circumstances of the 25th instant, I request that you call on Colonel Belson for a report in writing of the proceedings of the 28th Regiment on that day. WS

 

 

Return of Killed, Wounded & Missing of the Army under the command of His Excellency the Marquis of Wellington KG in action with the enemy on the 25th to 28th July 1813.[77]

 

  Regiments Killed Wounded
    General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
25 July 1813 General Staff                           1       1             2  
  6th Foot 1st Battalion                     2 2         1     1   2   15 19  
  7th Foot 1st Battalion           1         6 7                   1   23 24  
  20th Foot               1 2   12 15       1 1   4 2   2   103 113  
  23rd Foot 1st Battalion                 1   5 6           1 3         32 36  
  28th Foot 1st Battalion             1       8 9           2 3 1   3   109 118  
  34th Foot 2nd Battalion               1 2   19 22       1     2 1   3   51 58  
  39th Foot 1st Battalion           2     3   8 13           1 3 3   9   102 118  
  50th Foot 1st Battalion         1 2     2   19 24       1   2 4 3   9   149 168  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion           2       1 4 7                   1   10 11  
  71st Foot 1st Battalion           2     3   13 18         1 1 3     6 1 112 124  
  82nd Foot 1st Battalion                 1   7 8       1   2   1   7   60 71  
  92nd Foot 1st Battalion                 2   32 34       1 2 3 10 3   8   260 287  
  Brunswick Oels                 1   7 8           2 1     2   13 18  
  British Loss         1 9 1 2 17 1 142 173   1   5 5 15 33 15   53 1 1039 1167  
  Portuguese Loss                     3 3               1       19 20  
  Total Loss                                           53 1 1058 1187  
                                                       
26 July 1813 Royal German Artillery         1 9 1 2 17 1 145 176   1   5 5 15 33 16           2
  27th Foot 3rd Battalion                     6 6             1     1   18 21  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion           1         3 4           3 2     2   82 89  
  48th Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1         1 1           2 4  
  53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                   1           14 15  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                                     1         1 2  
  British Loss           1         10 11         1 4 4 2   3   117 131 2
  Portuguese Loss                     1 1                       3 3  
  Total Loss           1         11 12         1 4 4 2   3   120 134  
                                                       
27 July 1813 Royal Artillery                                               8 8  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion                                               2 3  
  53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                           1   1 1  
  Total British                                           1   11 12  
                                                       
28 July 1813 General Staff       1 1             2       2                 2  
  Artillery                                               6 6  
  2nd Foot (Queens)                     1 1             1         9 10  
  3rd Foot 1st Battalion (Buffs)                                               2 2 3
  7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion         1       3   43 47         1 4 6     11   148 169  
  11th Foot 1st Battalion                     5 5           1 3     1   41 46  
  20th Foot         1           23 24           2 3     2   77 84  
  23rd Fusiliers 1st Battalion         2       1 1 14 18             3   1 5   54 58  
  27th Foot 3rd Battalion         1     1 3   38 43           1 4 3 1 12 1 183 204  
  31st Foot 2nd Battalion                                     1   1     4 5  
  32nd Foot 1st Battalion                                 1             23 24  
  36th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1 1       15 18  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion           1     3   16 20             3 1   6 1 98 109  
  42nd Foot 1st Battalion                     3 3                   3 1 15 19  
  48th Foot 1st Battalion           1 1       10 12         1 1 6     1   103 112  
  53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                               9 9  
  57th Foot 1st Battalion                 1   1 2           1 1     2   57 61  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                     1 1                   1   3 4  
  61st Foot 1st Battalion                     2 2           1 1     2   56 60  
  79th Foot 1st Battalion                 1   3 4             1     1 1 28 31  
  95th Foot 1st Battalion                 1   11 12           1 3 2   1   91 98  
  Brunswick Oels                     1 1                       3 3  
  British Loss       1 6 2 1   13 1 172 197       2 3 12 35 7 3 48 4 1025 1139 3
  Portuguese Loss       1 2   3   4   153 163       5 4 13 9 11 3 41 6 808 895  
  Spanish Loss                     26 26     Twelve  Officers         155 155  
  Total       2 8 2 4 1 17 1 351 386       7 7 25 40 18 5 89 10 1983 2189 3
                                                       
  Total British       1 7 12 2 3 30 2 324 381   1   7 9 31 72 24 3 415 5 2192 2449 6
  Total Portuguese       1 2   3   4   157 157       5 4 13 9 12 3 41 6 825 918  
  Total Spanish                     26 26     Twelve Officers         155 155  
  Grand Total       2 9 12 5 3 34 2 507 574   1   12 13 44 81 35 5 145 11 3172 3522 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Regiments Missing Total
    General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
25 July 1813 General Staff                           1       1             2  
  6th Foot 1st Battalion                                 1     1   2   17 21  
  7th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1     1   29 31  
  20th Foot                     11 11       1 1   4 2 1 4   126 139  
  23rd Foot 1st Battalion                                   1 3     1   37 42  
  28th Foot 1st Battalion         1       1   30 32           3 3 2   4   147 159  
  34th Foot 2nd Battalion         2 1 3   1 1 80 88       1   2 3 4 1 6 1 150 168  
  39th Foot 1st Battalion           2     4 5 44 55           1 7 3   16 5 154 186  
  50th Foot 1st Battalion         1   1     1 54 57       1   4 6 4   11 1 222 249  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion           1     1   24 26             3     2 1 38 44  
  71st Foot 1st Battalion               1 1   52 54         1 1 5   1 10 1 177 196  
  82nd Foot 1st Battalion                               1   2   1   8   67 79  
  92nd Foot 1st Battalion                     22 22       1 2 3 10 3   10   314 343  
  Brunswick Oels                     15 15           2 1     3   35 41  
  British Loss         4 4 4 1 8 7 332 360   1   5 5 20 46 20 3 78 9 1513 1700  
  Portuguese Loss                     6 6               1       28 29  
  Total Loss         4 4 4 1 8 7 338 366   1   5 5 20 46 21 3 78 9 1541 1729  
                                                       
26 July 1813 Royal German Artillery                                                   2
  27th Foot 3rd Battalion                 1   14 15             1 1   2   38 42  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion                                   3 3     2   85 98  
  48th Foot 1st Battalion                     2 2         1 1           5 7  
  53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                     1         74 15[78]  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                                       1       1 2  
  British Loss                 1   16 17         1 4 5 2   4   143 159 2
  Portuguese Loss                                               4    
  Total Loss                 1   16 17         1 4 5 2   4   147 163 2
                                                       
27 July 1813 Royal Artillery                 1     1 1                 1     1 1
  40th Foot 1st Battalion                                               8 8  
  53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                     4 4                   1   6 7  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                                               1 1  
  Total British                 1   4 5 1                 2   15 17 1
                                                       
28 July 1813 General Staff                               2 1 1             4  
  Artillery                                               6 6 3
  2nd Foot (Queens)                                     1         10 11  
  3rd Foot 1st Battalion (Buffs)                                               2 2  
  7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion         1             1         1 6 5     14   191 217  
  11th Foot 1st Battalion                                   1 3     1   45 51  
  20th Foot                                   3 3     2   100 108  
  23rd Fusiliers 1st Battalion                                   2 3   1 6 1 68 81  
  27th Foot 3rd Battalion                     7 7           2 4 3 2 15 1 227 254  
  31st Foot 2nd Battalion                                         1     4 5  
  32nd Foot 1st Battalion                                 1             23 24  
  36th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1 1       15 18  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion                                     4 1   9 1 114 129  
  42nd Foot 1st Battalion                                           3 1 18 22  
  48th Foot 1st Battalion                     11 11         1 1 7 1   1   124 135  
  53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                               9 9  
  57th Foot 1st Battalion                                   1 1     3   58 63  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                                           1   4 5  
  61st Foot 1st Battalion                                   1 1     2   58 62  
  79th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1     2 1 31 35  
  95th Foot 1st Battalion                     2 2           1 3 2   2   104 112  
  Brunswick Oels                     1 1                       5 5  
  British Loss         1           21 22       2 4 19 37 8 4 61 5 1216 1358 3
  Portuguese Loss                 2   42 44       5 5 15 9 14 3 47 6 998 1102  
  Spanish Loss                     11 11       Twelve Officers Wounded   192 192  
  Total         1       2   74 77       7 9 34 48 22 7 108 11 2408 2652 3
                                                       
  Total British         5 4 4 1 10 7 373 404 1 1   7 10 45 88 30 7 145 14 2889 3234 6
  Total Portuguese                 2   48 50       5 5 15 9 15 3 47 6 1030 1135  
  Total Spanish                     11 11       Twelve Officers Wounded   192 192  
  Grand Total         5 4 4 1 12 7 432 465 1 1   12 15 58 97 45 10 192 20 4111 4587 6

Edward Pakenham Adjutant General

 

 

Names of the Officers Killed, Wounded and Missing from the 25th to 28th July (Inclusive) [1813]

Date Rank & Names Regiments Notes
British Officers Killed
25 July 1813 Lieutenant R Knowles 7th Royal Fusiliers 1st Battalion
Adjutant R Buist 20th Regiment
Ensign E Mullens 28th Regiment 1st Battalion
Adjutant J Hay 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Lieutenant J Lord 39th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant T Williams 39th Regiment 1st Battalion
Captain M Rudkin 50th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant H Birchall 50th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Wilson 50th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant von J Dalmann 60th Regiment 5th Battalion
Lieutenant J Joyce 60th Regiment 5th Battalion
Lieutenant A Duff 71st Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Roberts 71st Regiment 1st Battalion
26 July 1813 Lieutenant A Malone 40th Foot 1st Battalion
28 July 1813 Major  A Roverea Sicilian Regiment ADC to Lt Gen Cole
Captain C Avemann 1st Line Battalion KGL Brigade Major
Captain A Fernie 7th Royal Fusiliers 1st Battalion
Captain M MacKenzie 20th Regiment
Captain W Stainsforth 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion
Captain J Walker 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion
Captain T Whyte 27th Regiment 3rd Battalion
Adjutant H Burn 27th Regiment 3rd Battalion
Lieutenant A Galway 40th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant M Lima 48th Regiment 1st Battalion
Ensign L Parsons 48th Regiment 1st Battalion
Volunteer J Bassett 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion
Portuguese Officers Killed Captain Lucas G Pailha 4th Line Regiment
Major Candide Victoria 10th Line Regiment
Captain Aud F Fraccacos 10th Line Regiment
Ensign Lorenzo L Alvery 11th Line Regiment
Ensign Constant de S Girao 7th Cacadores
Ensign Versuiliae A Tavarey 10th Cacadores
British Officers Wounded

 

Lt General the Honourable W Stewart General Staff Severely
25 July 1813 Captain W Stewart General Staff Severely
Major H Gomm 6th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign S Radcliffe 6th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Colonel W Wallace 20th Regiment Severely
Major J Bent 20th Regiment Severely
Lieutenant F Champagne 20th Regiment Severely
Lieutenant W Crokat 20th Regiment Severely
Lieutenant J Walker 20th Regiment Severely
Lieutenant J Smith 20th Regiment Severely
Ensign J Thompson 20th Regiment Severely
Ensign R Oakley 20th Regiment Severely
Captain G Booker 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant G Browne 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant F O’Flaherty 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant H Ledwith 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Captain J Bradbey (Major) 28th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain W Meacham 28th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant R Tomlinson 28th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Crammer 28th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant S Gordon 28th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign E Hill 28th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Colonel W Fenwick 34th Foot 2nd Battalion Severely
Lieutenant P Barrow 34th Foot 2nd Battalion Severely
Lieutenant M Simmons 34th Foot 2nd Battalion Slightly
Ensign S Pickett 34th Foot 2nd Battalion Slightly
Captain J Jones 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant Park 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant C Cox 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant C Scanlan 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign P Poe 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign R Rhodes 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign W Courtenay 39th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Colonel C Hill 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain C Grant 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain R North 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant W Nowlan 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant D McDonald 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant R Jones 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant W Patterson 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign C Collins 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign S Bateman 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign R White 50th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Major M MacKenzie 71st Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain W Grant 71st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant A Pack 71st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant T Park 71st Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant W Peacocke 71st Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant Colonel W Grant (Major) 82nd Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Captain B Firman 82nd Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain G Marshall 82nd Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Ensign S Lacy 82nd Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Colonel J Cameron 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Major J Mitchell 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Major D McPherson 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Captain G Holmes 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Captain D McDonald 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant W Fyfe 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant D McPherson 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Chisholm 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant D McDonald 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Durie 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Ross 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant R Winchester 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant G Gordon 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Grant 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant A McDonald 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Ensign F Mitchell 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Ensign G Mitchell 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Ensign E Kennedy 92nd Regiment 1st Battalion
Captain F Proestler Brunswick Oels Slightly
Captain E Braxein Brunswick Oels Slightly
Lieutenant A Griersheim Brunswick Oels Severely
26 July 1813 Lieutenant C Crawford 27th Regiment 3rd Battalion Severely (since dead)
Ensign A Byrne 27th Regiment 3rd Battalion Slightly
Captain A Heyland 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain E Bowen 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain R Phillips 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Kelly 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant J Thoreau 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Major J Wilson (Lt Colonel) 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain G Thwaites 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Fraser 53rd Regiment 2nd Battalion Severely
Ensign C Martin 60th Regiment 5th Battalion
28 July 1813 Lt Colonel the Honourable A Gordon 3rd Guards General Staff ADC to the Commander of the Forces Severely
Lt Colonel Waters AAG General Staff Slightly
Lieutenant W Hutton 2nd Regiment Severely
Major W Despard 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Captain J Crowder 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Slightly
Captain W Hammerton 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Captain J Orr 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Captain Skerry 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant G Loggan 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Fraser 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Nunn 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J King 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant Garrett 7th Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Captain Horum 11th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant W Moore 11th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Christian 11th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant R Daniell 11th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Captain E Jackson 20th Regiment Severely
Captain J Murray 20th Regiment Slightly
Lieutenant J Bainbrigge 20th Regiment Severely
Lieutenant R Lewis 20th Regiment Severely
Lieutenant C Connor 20th Regiment Slightly
Lieutenant J Nevill 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant A Brice 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant I Harris 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Slightly
Adjutant Maclellan 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers 1st Battalion Severely
Captain T Hamilton 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Slightly
Lieutenant G Pratt 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Severely
Lieutenant C Pollock 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Severely
Lieutenant F Hanby 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Severely
Lieutenant J Drewe 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Severely
Ensign T Radcliffe 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Severely
Ensign Poens 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Slightly
Ensign R Clunes 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Severely
[Assistant] Surgeon W Wray 27th Regiment 3rd Battalions Slightly
Quartermaster M McIntosh 31st Regiment 2nd Battalions Slightly
Major J Wood (Lt Colonel) 32nd Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant M Smith 36th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign J Skerry 36th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Glynne 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant T O’Dogherty 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant N Carter 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Ensign M Smith 40th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Major W White 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Captain H Wood 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Cuthbertson 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Duke 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant H Robinson 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant C Vandermeulen 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant H Pountney 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant Johnstone 48th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Captain J Burrows 57th Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant R Price 57th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain E Charlton 61st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant D O’Kearney 61st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant J Kynoch 79th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Captain R Lowrie 91st Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant R Stewart 91st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant A MacLean 91st Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Marshall 91st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Ensign P Macfarlane 91st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Ensign J Ormiston 91st Regiment 1st Battalion Slightly
Volunteer Lloyd 32nd Regiment Slightly
Volunteer D Campbell 57th Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
Volunteer Peebody 61st Regiment 1st Battalion Severely
British Officers Missing
25 July 1813 Captain W Irvine 28th Regiment 1st Battalion
Captain J Wyatt 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Captain M Sherer 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Lieutenant F Hovenden 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Ensign T Phillips 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Ensign F Russell 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Ensign Norman 34th Regiment 2nd Battalion
Lieutenant T Phillips 39th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant W Hughes 39th Regiment 1st Battalion
Captain W Ambrose 50th Regiment 1st Battalion
Ensign J Williams 50th Regiment 1st Battalion
Lieutenant J Barbaz 60th Regiment 5th Battalion
Adjutant W Woolcombe 71st Regiment 1st Battalion
28 July 1813 Captain Tarleton 7th Fusiliers
Portuguese Wounded Lieutenant Colonel A Campbell 4th Regiment of the Line Severely
Major A de Almeida Figuera 4th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Captain L de Lamos Vasconcellos 4th Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain Pedro Jose Fredrico 4th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant A Campbell 4th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant B M de Bosa 4th Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant L M de Kora 4th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign E F Loares Sardinhas 4th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Ensign D X de S de Arroyo 4th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign D L A de Nunha 4th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Adjutant Jose P de Rey 4th Regiment of the Line Severely
Major G O de Taria 10th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Adjutant Joao des Santos 10th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant Joao Gualbert 10th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant Pedro Pinto 10th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Captain Manoel Ant de Suna 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain I Manuel de Fonseca 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant M Martinho Gerao 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign A de S Valento 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign I Maria do Ananjo 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Anselmo Xavier 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign D’Anto de Iluena 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Joao Rodante 10th Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain Thornton Severely
Captain J B C de Aploim Severely
Adjutant Manoel Jose Constantia 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain Jeronimo Freire 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain Thomas Antonio 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain R Steiger 23rd Regiment of the Line Slightly
Captain T Jose Pereira 23rd Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant P A Ribucho 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Felia Jose Freire 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Jose d’Almeida 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign D’Antonio Cardoza 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Colonel Bryan O’Toole 7th Cacadores Severely
Lieutenant Colonel Joao Paes de Sande 7th Cacadores Slightly
Captain F de P Rozade 7th Cacadores Severely
Ensign F Dioge Lozailo 7th Cacadores Severely
Lieutenant Colonel Richard Armstrong 10th Cacadores Severely
Major J H Green 10th Cacadores Severely
Captain Anselmo Jose de Guira 10th Cacadores Severely
Captain Jose Rodrigues de Lima 10th Cacadores Severely
Lieutenant Joao Honoratio Roleia 10th Cacadores Severely

 

Names of the Officers killed, wounded & missing 30 July 1813

Dates Rank & Names Regiments Remarks
Killed  
30 July 1813 Major G Crespigny 68th Infantry British Officer
Captain W Whitting 74th Infantry British Officer
Captain J Tournefort Chasseurs Britaniques British Officer
Major Lourenzo Martino Pegado (Lt Colonel) 2nd Regiment of Line Portuguese Officer
Captain M Gibbon 2nd Regiment of Line Portuguese Officer
Adjutant Jose M Cabreira 14th Regiment of Line Portuguese Officer
Lieutenant Christavau De Souza a Abinho 23rd Regiment of Line Portuguese Officer
British Wounded  
Major General Pack General Staff Slightly
Lieutenant E Sandys 6th Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Captain T Jones 32nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant T Ross Lewin 32nd Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Ensign A Orrell 34th Foot 2nd Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Charles 36th Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant J Foulkes 40th Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant B Humfrey 45th Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign W Sawkins 50th Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Adjutant J Myles 50th Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Adjutant J Kent 60th Foot 5th Battalion Slightly
Captain G MacLean 61st Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Mosse 61st Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Captain H Irwin 68th Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Leith 68th Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign J Connell 68th Foot 1st Battalion Severely arm amputated
Captain L Walker 71st Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Brevet Major W Moore 74th Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant A Pattison 74th Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant F Dunscombe 74th Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant W Tew 74th Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Lieutenant Colonel W Grant 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Major W Fitzgerald 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J MacKay 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant J Boyd 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Lieutenant G Wood 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Ensign Mason 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Adjutant S Holdsworth 82nd Foot 1st Battalion Slightly
Major D MacNeill 91st Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Captain G Holmes 92nd Foot 1st Battalion Severely
Major A Combremont Chasseur Britannique Slightly
Captain N Brem Chasseur Britannique Severely
Captain F Freuller Chasseur Britannique Slightly
Captain L de Saulx Chasseur Britannique Severely
Lieutenant Dupuy Chasseur Britannique Slightly
Lieutenant F Sunharry Chasseur Britannique Severely
Lieutenant P St Colombo Chasseur Britannique Slightly
Lieutenant A Servais Chasseur Britannique Severely
Adjutant P Boussingault Chasseur Britannique Severely
Portuguese Wounded Brigadario Hosspalita de Costa General Staff Severely
Lieutenant Colonel Juan de Manezas 2nd Regiment of the Line Slightly
Major Robert Ray 2nd Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Francesca Rebello de Moira 2nd Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Juze Nepumuno du Utardu 2nd Regiment of the Line Dangerously
Ensign Francisco de Paulie Babrita 2nd Regiment of the Line Slightly
Ensign Benlo Juze Tavares 2nd Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Aruna Pamfio Ceurrer 2nd Regiment of the Line Slightlu
Fumaico Juze Furtada 2nd Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Colonel Max Grant 6th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Captain Joao Iraquinn 6th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Captain John Sutherland 6th Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Joao M Pereira 6th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant Manuel Jose de Ainha 6th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Ensign Antonio Joaquim do Mendoucu 6th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Ensign Joze de Snura Pinta 6th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Lucas Masino 11th Regiment of the LIne Severely
Lieutenant Colonel John McDonald 14th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Major F de Paula Cabrita 14th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Captain Luves Fillipi 14th Regiment of the Line Dangerously
Captain Thomas Patten 14th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant Bert Guesse 14th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Colonel M Pamplana 18th Regiment of the Line Severely
Lieutenant Colonel H Pymm 18th Regiment of the Line Dangerously
Major F do Paula Begnano 18th Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Victarino Juze de Sal 18th Regiment of the Line Severely
Antonio Veina de Vassamabbas 18th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant Lister 19th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Lieutenant R M de Malta 19th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Ensign F Nauvia de Cunha 19th Regiment of the Line Slightly
Ensign Joaquin Ribeira 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Ensign Antonio Lewis de Fumesia 23rd Regiment of the Line Severely
Captain Juorge Fermino P Amudo 2nd Cacadores Severely
Major S Mitchel 6th Cacadores Very Slightly
Captain R Brunton 6th Cacadores Very Slightly
Captain W G Temple 6th Cacadores Very Slightly
Captain Joao de M Madureira 6th Cacadores Severely
Lieutenant Pio Manual de Seusa 6th Cacadores Severely
Ensign H Bankhausen 6th Cacadores Slightly
Ensign Joao Clevisostimo Villaza 7th Cacadores Slightly
Ensign Iquaio Bermuda de Francisca 7th Cacadores Slightly
Major Lewis Misia de Cinquira 9th Cacadores Severely
Ensign Iquaiuo Fai Rocha 9th Cacadores Slightly
Ensign Joaquim Iraquim de Cecerta 9th Cacadores Slightly
Lieutenant Bartley 50th Foot 1st Battalion British Missing
Lieutenant J Power 50th Foot 1st Battalion British Missing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return of Killed, Wounded & Missing of the Army under the command of His Excellency the Marquis of Wellington KG in action with the enemy on the 30th July 1813.

 

Regiments Killed Wounded
  General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
General Staff                           1                     1  
Royal Artillery                     1 1 3                     8 8 4
6th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1         5 6  
11th Foot 1st Battalion                     2 2                   1   19 20  
24th Foot 2nd Battalion                                               1 1  
28th Foot 1st Battalion                                               8 8  
32nd Foot 1st Battalion                 1   2 3           1 1     2 2 25 30  
34th Foot 2nd Battalion                 1   5 6               1   1   14 16  
36th Foot 1st Battalion                     6 6             1         19 20  
39th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   2 3  
40th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1     1   5 7  
42nd Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1                       7 7  
45th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1         7 8  
50th Foot 1st Battalion                     3 3               1 1 2   12 16  
51st Foot                     2 2                   3 2 17 22  
53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                               6 6  
58th Foot 2nd Battalion                     1 1                       1 1  
60th Foot 5th Battalion                     1 1                 1 2   19 22  
61st Foot 1st Battalion                 1     1           1 1     2   8 12  
68th Foot       1             3 4           1 1 1       16 19  
71st Foot 1st Battalion                     8 8           1       4   24 29  
74th Foot         1       1   5 7           1 3     3   35 42  
79th Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1                     1 15 17  
82nd Foot 1st Battalion                     9 9                   9   67 83  
88th Foot 1st Battalion                               1 1   3 1 1     1 1  
91st Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1         1             7 8  
92nd Foot 1st Battalion                 1   8 9           1           26 27  
Chasseurs Britannique         1       1   11 13         1 3 5     1   18 28  
Brunswick Oels Lt Infantry                     2 2                       1 1  
                                                     
British Loss       1 2       6   72 81 3 1   1 3 9 18 4 3 32 4 294 459 4
Portuguese Loss       1 1 1   1 8   130 142   1 1 4 5 8 8 17   31 8 750 843  
Total Loss       2 3 1   1 14   202 223 3 2 1 5 8 17 26 21 3 63 12 1054 1312 4

 

Regiments Missing Total
  General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
General Staff                                                 1  
Royal Artillery                                               9 9 7
6th Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1             1         6 7  
11th Foot 1st Battalion                 1     1                   2   21 23  
24th Foot 2nd Battalion                                               1 1  
28th Foot 1st Battalion                     3 3                       11 11  
32nd Foot 1st Battalion                                   1 1     3 1 27 33  
34th Foot 2nd Battalion                     9 9               1   2   28 31  
36th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1         25 26  
39th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   2 3  
40th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1     1   5 7  
42nd Foot 1st Battalion                                               8 8  
45th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1         7 8  
50th Foot 1st Battalion           2         9 11             2 1 1 2   24 30  
51st Foot                                           3 2 19 24  
53rd Foot 2nd Battalion                                               6 6  
58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                               2 2  
60th Foot 5th Battalion                                           1 2 20 23  
61st Foot 1st Battalion                                   1 1       3 8 13  
68th Foot                                 1 1 1 1       19 23  
71st Foot 1st Battalion                   1 12 13           1       5   44 50  
74th Foot                                   2 3     4   40 49  
79th Foot 1st Battalion                                             1 17 18  
82nd Foot 1st Battalion                               1 1   3 1 1 9   76 92  
88th Foot 1st Battalion                                               1 1  
91st Foot 1st Battalion                                 1             8 9  
92nd Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1           1         1 35 37  
Chasseurs Britannique                   1 3 4         1 4 5       3 32 45  
Brunswick Oels Light Infantry                     14 14                       17 17  
                                                     
British Loss           2       3 52 57   1   1 4 11 20 4 3 41 4 578 607 7
Portuguese Loss                     135 135   1 1 4 6 9 9 17 1 39 8 1025 1120  
Total Loss           2       3 187 192   2 1 5 10 20 29 21 4 80 12 1543 1727 7

Edward Pakenham Adjutant General

Officers Killed, Wounded & Missing 31 July 1813 & 1st August

31 July 1813

Killed

Captain Campbell                                             19th Regiment of the Line Portuguese

British Officers Wounded

Captain Wemyss                                              50th Foot 1st Battalion (Brigade Major)                                                     Severely

Captain Grant                                                    71st Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                      Slightly

Major McPherson                                            92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                     Severely

Captain Seaton                                                 92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                     Slightly

Captain Lee                                                        92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                     Slightly

Captain D Campbell                                         92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                     Severely

Lieutenant Hope                                              92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                     Severely

Ensign S Mitchell                                              92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                                                                     Slightly

Lieutenant de Blemur                                     Chasseurs Britaniques                                                                                    Slightly

Volunteer Browning                                       68th Foot                                                                                                              Slightly

 

1 August 1813

 

Lieutenant Fitzgerald                                      20th Foot                                                                                                              Slightly

Captain Butler                                                   27th Foot 3rd Battalion                                                                                     Severely

Captain Percival                                                (Major) 95th Foot 3rd Battalion                                                                     Severely

 

Portuguese Officers Wounded

 

31 July 1813

 

Colonel Ashworth                                            General Staff                                                                                                     Slightly

Major Domingo Anthosing                           6th Regiment of the Line                                                                                Slightly

Ensign Ingnatius M de Vasconcelles         6th Regiment of the Line                                                                                Severely

Lieutenant Antonio P Heytor                       7th Regiment of the Line                                                                                Slightly

 

Missing

 

31 July 1813

 

Major Fitzgerald                                               (Lt Colonel) 60th Foot 5th Battalion

 

 

 

Return of Killed, Wounded & Missing of the Army under the command of His Excellency the Marquis of Wellington KG in action with the enemy on the 31st July to 1 August 1813 (inclusive). [Engagement of Donna Maria]

 

  Regiments Killed Wounded
    General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
31 July 1813 General Staff                                   1             1  
  28th Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1                       1 1  
  34th Foot 2nd Battalion                     1 1                       13 13  
  39th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   3 4  
  50th Foot 1st Battalion                     6 6                   2   24 26  
  51st Foot                 1   4 5                   4   36 40  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                                               2 2  
  68th Foot                 1   4 5                   2 3 20 25  
  71st Foot 1st Battalion                 1   1 2           1       4 1 29 35  
  82nd Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   2 3  
  92nd Foot 1st Battalion                 1   9 10         1 3 1 1   3   66 75  
  Chasseurs Britannique                 1   8 9             1     3   12 16  
  British Loss                 5   34 39         1 5 2 1   20 4 208 241  
  Portuguese Loss         1           11 12     1   1   1 1   2   34 40  
  Total Loss         1       5   45 51     1   2 5 3 2   22 4 242 281  
1 August 1813 20th Foot                     1 1             1     3   2 6  
  23rd Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1                       4 4  
  27th Foot 3rd Battalion                     1 1           1           14 15  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   1 2  
  48th  Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1                       3 3  
  95th Foot 1st Battalion                                               2 2  
  95th Foot 3rd Battalion                 1   2 3           1           5 6  
  British Loss                 1   6 7           2 1     4   31 38  
  Portuguese Loss                                               8 8  
  Grand Total                 1   6 7           2 1     4   39 46  
                                                       
On the 31 July and 1 August Total British Loss                 6   40 46         1 7 3 1   24 4 239 279  
  Total Portuguese Loss         1           11 12     1   1   1 1   2   42 48  
  Grand Total         1       6   51 58     1   2 7 4 2   26 4 281 327  

 

 

 

 

 

  Regiments Missing Total
    General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
31 July 1813 General Staff                                   1             1  
  28th Foot 1st Battalion                                               2 2  
  34th Foot 2nd Battalion                     2 2                       16 16  
  39th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   3 4  
  50th Foot 1st Battalion                     14 14                   2   44 46  
  51st Foot                     6 6                   5   46 51  
  60th Foot 5th Battalion                       1         1             2 3  
  68th Foot                                           3 3 24 30  
  71st Foot 1st Battalion                                   1       5 1 30 37  
  82nd Foot 1st Battalion       1                                   1   2 3  
  92nd Foot 1st Battalion                                 1 3 1 1   4   75 85  
  Chasseurs Britannique                 1   7 8             1     5   27 33  
  British Loss       1         1   29 31         2 5 2 1   26 4 271 311  
  Portuguese Loss                     16 16     1   1 1 1 1   2   61 68  
  Total Loss       1         1   45 47     1   3 6 3 2   28 4 332 379  
1 August 1813 20th Foot                                   1       3   3 7  
  23rd Foot 1st Battalion                                               5 5  
  27th Foot 3rd Battalion                                 1             15 16  
  40th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   1 2  
  48th  Foot 1st Battalion                                               4 4  
  95th Foot 1st Battalion                                               2 2  
  95th Foot 3rd Battalion                     1 1         1         1   8 10  
  British Loss                     1 1         2 1       5   38 45  
  Portuguese Loss                                               8 8  
  Grand Total                     1 1         2 1       5   46 54  
                                                       
  Total British Loss       1         1   30 32         2 7 3 1   31 4 309 357  
  Total Portuguese Loss                     16 16     1   1 1 1 1   2   69 76  
  Grand Total       1         1   46 48     1   3 8 4 2   33 4 378 432  

Edward Pakenham Adjutant General

 

 

Names of Officers Killed, Wounded & Missing [2 August 1813]

Killed (British)

 

Captain Brownlow                                           6th Foot 1st Battalion

Ensign Watson                                                  20th Foot 1st Battalion

 

Wounded (British)

 

Captain A Hamilton                                         4th West India Regiment ADC to Major Barnes                     Severely

Major Campbell                                                6th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                        Severely

Lieutenant Everest                                          6th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                        Slightly

Lieutenant Tarleton                                        6th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                        Severely

Lieutenant Addison                                         6th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                        Severely

Lieutenant Colonel Wauchope                   20th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                     Severely

Lieutenant Rotton                                           20th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                     Severely

Lieutenant Lutyens                                         20th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                     Slightly

Lieutenant Colonel Kelly                                24th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Severely

Captain Lepper                                                 24th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Severely

Captain Bruckell                                                24th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Slightly

Adjutant Fleming                                             24th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Slightly

Major Campbell                                                58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Severely

Captain Westropp                                           58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Slightly

Lieutenant Spier                                               58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Severely

Lieutenant Hayton                                           58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Slightly

Lieutenant Lemprier                                       58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Severely

Ensign Baylee                                                    58th Foot 2nd Battalion                                                                    Severely

Lieutenant Pemberton                                  95th Foot 1st Battalion                                                                     Severely

Lieutenant Colonel Hertzberg                     Brunswick Light Infantry                                                                               Slightly

Lieutenant Koshenbar                                   Brunswick Light Infantry                                                                               Severely

Lieutenant Broemboen                                 Brunswick Light Infantry                                                                               Slightly

Ensign Meyer                                                    Brunswick Light Infantry                                                                               Slightly

 

Wounded (Portuguese)

 

Ensign Antonio Maximilien Figueira          2nd Cacadores                                                                                    Slightly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return of Killed, Wounded & Missing of the Army under the command of His Excellency the Marquis of Wellington KG in action with the enemy on the 2nd August 1813. [Echalar]

 

Regiments Killed Wounded
  General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
General Staff                                   1             1  
6th Foot 1st Battalion         1       1   11 13         1   3     4   114 122  
7th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   4 4  
20th Foot             1         1       1     2     3   23 29  
23rd Foot 1st Battalion                                               3 3  
24th Foot 2nd Battalion                 2   4 6       1   2       2   52 58  
43rd Foot 1st Battalion                                             1   1  
58th Foot 2nd Battalion                 1   8 9         1 1 3 1   5   55 66  
95th Foot 1st Battalion                     1 1             1         10 11  
95th Foot 3rd Battalion                     1 1                   2   11 13  
Brunswick Oels                     1 1       1     2 1       7 11  
                                                     
British Loss         1   1   4   26 32       3 2 4 11 2 1 17 1 278 319  
Portuguese Loss                     1 1               1   1 1 5 8  
Total Loss         1   1   4   27 33       3 2 4 11 3 1 18 2 283 327  

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments Missing Total
  General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses General Staff Colonel Lieutenant Colonel

 

 

Majors Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff Sergeants Drummers Rank & File Total Horses
General Staff                                   1             1  
6th Foot 1st Battalion                     3 3         1 1 3     5   128 138  
7th Foot 1st Battalion                                           1   3 4  
20th Foot                               1     2 1   3   23 30  
23rd Foot 1st Battalion                                               3 3  
24th Foot 2nd Battalion                     1 1       1   2     1 4   57 65  
43rd Foot 1st Battalion                                             1   1  
58th Foot 2nd Battalion                     1 1         1 1 3 1   6   64 76  
95th Foot 1st Battalion                                     1         11 12  
95th Foot 3rd Battalion                                           2   12 14  
Brunswick Oels                     2 2       1     2 1       10 14  
                                                     
British Loss                     7 7       3 2 5 11 3 1 21 1 311 358  
Portuguese Loss                                       1   1 1 6 9  
Total Loss                     7 7       3 2 5 11 4 1 22 2 317 367  

 

To Major General Pringle

 

Proposed arrangement for the change of posts occupied by the 2nd, 3rd and 6th Divisions

 

 

7 August Brigadier General Campbell’s Brigade

1st Brigade of Major General Morillo’s

From Maya to Los Aldudes. The 6th Division to march the same day from Los Aldudes to Maya after [they are] relieved by Brigadier General Campbell; and the next morning the 6th Division will relieve the posts occupied by the 2nd Division of Infantry.
8 August 1st Brigade of Major General Morillo’s From Los Aldudes to Roncesvalles, and one brigade [of the] 3rd Division, when relieved by the 1st Brigade of Major General Morillo’s, to march the same day to Los Aldudes and the next day to continue its march to Maya.
2nd Brigade of Major General Morillo’s

Major General Walker’s Brigade

Major General Byng’s Brigade

To Los Aldudes, on the next morning (9 August) these troops will continue their march to Roncesvalles and take up the ground occupied by the remainder of the 3rd Division, which after [being] relieved will proceed the same day to Los Aldudes and on the 10 August to Maya.
10 August Major General Pringle’s Brigade

Brigadier General Ashworth’s Brigade

Brigadier General Da Costa’s Portuguese Brigade

To march from Mayo to Los Aldudes and on the following morning (11 August) will continue their march upon Roncesvalles, with the exception of Brigadier General Da Costa’s Brigade.
Station of the troops 11 August 3rd and 6th Divisions Puerto de Maya &c

Conde d’Amarante’s Portuguese Division – Los Aldudes

2nd Division & General Morillo’s Division – Roncesvalles

 

Memorandum,

The troops under the orders of Sir Rowland Hill in carrying into effect these changes of posts will commence their march every morning precisely at 6 o’clock unless orders to the contrary should be given.  Alexander Abercromby, Lieutenant Colonel, AQMG

 

A true copy – N Thorn Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General[79]

 

 

Roncesvalles 20 August 1813

Sir,

I am directed by Major General Walker[80] to enclose you, for your guidance, a copy of the instructions which he has this day received from Lieutenant Colonel Abercromby Assistant Quarter Master General[81], relative to the distribution of the troops under the orders of Lieutenant General Sir Rowland Hill KB, and the points of the position which the several brigades are destined to defend. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient servant, N Thorn, Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General

Private

To Major General Walker commanding the 2nd Division

Camp near Roncesvalles 20 August 1813

Sir,

Lieutenant General Sir Rowland Hill, having deemed it necessary that you should be made acquainted with the general distribution of the troops under his immediate command, has the following arrangements, which he has though proper to approve of, and in the event of them undergoing any change, I will do myself the honour to communicate them to you.

Right Column

Major General Morillo has been charged with the defence of that part of the country between the great road from Roncesvalles to St Jean de Pied de Port and with the line of the Irati River. This force is distributed as follows

The 1st Brigade is placed at the Fabrica do Orbaizeta with orders to defend that post to the last, and if forced, by superior numbers, to retire disputing the ground, by the road leading from thence to Roncesvalles.

The 2nd Brigade of Morillo’s is posted along the Irati River, having one regiment at Orbaizeta, one at Orbara and one a little to the rear of that place.

The nature of the ground on this side is so strong that this brigade ought to afford security to the right flank of our position against the attack of superior numbers. The road by which these troops would retire if necessary is by Arrive and Garralda to Burguete or Espinal. General Morillo’s headquarters are established at Orbaizeta

Right Centre Column

Major General Walker will be pleased to consider himself, although in command of the 2nd Division, more particularly charged with the superintendence of the right centre column, consisting of Major General Byng’s and Brigadier General Ashworth’s Brigades. The points which these troops are to defend are as follows

The great road from Roncesvalles to St Jean Pied de Port, and the position that line affords, and with the protection of the Val Carlos road.

Left Centre Column

Major General Pringle will be responsible for the charge of the left centre column and which will consist of the 1st and 2nd Brigades, having the defence of the ridge which runs towards the great Arrola mountain and by which the enemy advanced on the 25th ultimo.

Left Column

His Excellency the Conde de Amarante with the two brigades of Portuguese under his command is considered as invested with the protection of the valley of the Aldudes and these troops are destined to occupy such positions as the movements of the enemy may render expedient, on the heights between the left of Major General Pringle’s column and the road from Aldudes to Banca or [St Etienne de] Baigorry.

Regular communications must be kept up between all the columns by means of small infantry posts placed at intermediate distances.

The general officers commanding the columns are requested to visit frequently, the progress of the field works now constructing on different points of the position and Sir Rowland Hill will be obliged to them to reduce such of the duties as are now given, according to the nature of the field works afford a protection to the ground when it can be done without the necessity of the same number of men being required, but, at the same time, having a view to the perfect safety of every point of the position.

Major General Walker will be so good as to send a copy of these instructions to Major General Pringle.

Alexander Abercromby

Assistant Quarter Master General

A true copy, N Thorn Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General

To Major General Pringle

Roncesvalles 21 August 1813

Sir,

In pursuance of the enclosed instructions & in consequence of the increased strength of the position of Great Arcola Ridge from the completion of the blockhouse & work, I wish the piquet of 60 now occupying it to be reduced to one captain, one subaltern & 50 rank & file, that in front of it to the same number & the advance under another subaltern to 25. That the officers in command of the last two be instructed in case of being obliged to retire before a superior force to fall back upon the corps in the rear, but that the captain & piquet in the work shall when the position without is no longer tenable, then retire to the Block House & then defend themselves to the utmost, even though the army or this corps should by any change of position be separated from them for 4 or 5 days. The officer commanding this piquet will for this purpose receive from the commissary 5 days & rations of provisions & fuel & 2 quarts of water per man for the care of which & of 6,000 spare rounds of ammunition, he will be held responsible & is not to allow any part to be used, but in case of being left to his own defence, when it will be his duty to provide for a daily distribution of the rations & against waste & it must be his particular charge to his men, as the quantity of ammunition is limited, that when under cover of their walls. No shot is fired without a correct & determined aim. You will also be so obliging to give orders that the above, with what further instructions you may deem necessary, may be distinctly written out & handed over at the daily relief from one captain to the other & that it may be inserted in their reports that this has been complied with & that all the articles have been received in a proper state. With respect to the other works in the rear, I shall, when it [is] expected complete, have the honour to communicate from there with you & have the honour to be Sir, your obedient humble servant, G Walker Major General, commanding 2nd Division.

To Major General Walker

Camp near Roncesvalles 21 August 1813

Sir,

I am directed by Sir Rowland Hill to request you will be pleased to give the necessary orders to Major General Pringle, commanding the left centre column to make such arrangements as appear most expedient for the defence of the block house on the Great Arcola Ridge which is reported to be nearly finished. 2 officers and 50 men Sir Rowland Hill thinks ought to be appointed for the particular duty of the defence of the block house and on any emergency this party should be in readiness to occupy the work, which will be provided with 2,000 spare rounds of ammunition and 4 or 5 day’s water and provisions to enable them to hold out in the event of the enemy or this corps moving to either flank or to the rear for that space of time.

Mr Aylmer[82] will be desired to lay in the provisions and Major Cairncross[83] will, on your order supply the ammunition and Sir Rowland begs you will such further orders as you may judge best for the defence of the work above mentioned and also for the defence of the redoubt in rear of the block house which the engineer reports would require 200 men. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient humble servant, Alexander Abercromby Lieutenant Colonel AQMG.

To Major General Pringle

26 August 1813

Montes de Los Aldudes

Sir,

A sincere sense of gratitude which I strongly feel, makes me write these few lines, to return my warmest thanks for the very handsome mention, which you were kind enough to make to Sir R[owland] Hill; of the conduct of the battalion of the 14th Regiment, which served under your orders in the action of the 30th instant I intended to do myself the pleasure of waiting upon you in person, but as I am prevented by duty, allow me to request, that you will accept my most sincere and unfeigned thanks and at the same time assure you, that the height of my wishes, is to have the honor [sic] of acting under your directions upon some other occasion and that the regiment may keep up that character which you had the goodness to give them. I have the honour to be with much esteem, Sir, your most obedient servant, John Macdonald Lieutenant Colonel commanding the 14th Regiment [of] Infantry[84].

To Major General Pringle

Roncesvalles 26th August 1813

Major General Walker has the honour to enclose for the information of Major General Pringle a letter from Colonel Abercrombie a request he will be good enough to nominate forthwith the officers & men required for the garrison of the post from the brigade off duty for the week, so that in case of attack or retreat, they may know their post. He will also be good enough to order a sufficient quantity of fuel to be laid in. The commanding officer of the artillery will receive directions to furnish them with 24,000 rounds of ammunition for the care of which & of the provisions. The officer commanding will be held responsible & be under the same general instructions given with respect to the blockhouse in front, with such further orders as Major General Pringle may think requisite.

To Major General Walker

Camp Roncesvalles, 26th August 1813

Sir,

I have received Sir Rowland Hill’s commands to acquaint you, that the fort on the left of this encampment is now so far advanced as to admit of the necessary supplies being placed in it and I have this morning written to Mr Aylmer to desire he would give directions for five day’s provisions and water equal to the consumption of 3 officers and 200 men being furnished with as little delay as possible and Sir Rowland Hill requests you will communicate to Major General Pringle, that in the event of an attack, the above number of officers and men will be thrown into the redoubt for its defence and Major Cairncross will supply such proportion of musquet ammunition as you may think proper to order. I have the honour to be Sir, your most obedient, humble servant, Alexander Abercromby AQMG

A true copy, S Thorn, DAQMG

To Major General Walker

Camp Roncesvalles 30th August 1813 10 pm

Sir,

All reports received within these two days agree in stating that the enemy have augmented their force very considerably upon the right of their line and that it is expected amongst them, that an attempt is to be made against our left for the relief of San Sebastian. Lord Wellington in his instructions Sir R. Hill thinks it desirable under these circumstances to try to effect some division in favour of our left, by endeavouring to disquiet the troops the enemy has left opposite to us.

This may be effected by making rather more show than usual upon the heights in light of the enemy’s camps and by pushing forward patrols in such directions as are most likely to give him uneasiness & make him apprehend an attack. These divisions should be made tomorrow morning, if no material change of circumstances takes place, at 8 o’clock. You will be so good however to bear in mind, that it is by no means Sir R. Hill’s intention, that any serious attempt should be made against the enemy, or that the troops employed should be in any manner committed.

The relief of the brigades will not take place tomorrow & Sir Rowland Hill wishes you to communicate these instructions to Major General Byng[85], whose brigade will be employed on this service & likewise to Major General Pringle, who will move with the 2nd Brigade on the heights towards the Arcola mountain, with which brigade Sir R. Hill will be found, should you have occasion to send any reports to him. The 2nd & 3rd Brigades will give no working parties tomorrow. They will be furnished by the First Brigade & by Major General Ashworth’s Brigade. I have &c A. Abercromby AQMG

To Major General Pringle

Roncesvalles, 31st August 1813

Sir,

I am directed by Major General Walker to transmit you the annexed copy of a letter dated last night, and to request that you will be pleased to act accordingly as far as regards the brigade under your command. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient servant, August Heise AAG

 

Roncesvalles, 8 September 1813

To Major General Pringle, commanding 2nd Brigade.

Sir,

As I am informed for the first time, by the commander of the forces dispatch of the 1st of August, ‘that you had directed the four Portuguese guns, which were lost on 25 July, to retire by the village of Maya, previous to my having given orders that they should follow another route.’ I request that you will do me the honour to report in writing what were the orders given by you relative to those guns, previous to my having arrived on the heights on the above mentioned day. Exclusive of the attention which I should have felt it to be due to you to have given to any previous arrangement of yours on that occasion, had I been apprised of the same, by the construction which is naturally to be put upon the context of the Marquis of Wellington’s postscript, I appear to have caused the loss of the Portuguese guns, in consequence of having acted in direct opposition to such arrangement.

As I have already had the honour of stating, it is now only that I learn, by a perusal of the commander of the forces dispatch, that you had given the orders in question & in justice to both of us, as well as to the actual state of the case, it is due that the matter be placed before His Excellency in its true light.

have the honour to be, Sir, your very faithful servant, William Stewart Lt General

 

Burguete 8 September 1813

Sir,

I have had the honour to receive your letter of this day’s date, desiring me to report to you in writing, the orders I had given on the 26th July to the officer in command of the Portuguese guns, previous to your arrival upon the heights & I beg in reply to acquaint you, that soon after the action began on that day, a Portuguese officer came to me for orders respecting his guns. I told him that as I was ignorant of what arrangements you had made for them in case of our being obliged to fall back & that as I expected you to arrive on the heights every moment, I did not wish to give any orders respecting them, but desired him to wait your arrival. He repeatedly came to me afterwards during the time we were warmly engaged & as I understood him, told me that if I did not give him some orders, of which way the guns should retire, they must be lost. I then asked him which was the most practicable road for them to retire in case it was necessary, when I understood him that the road by which they came through Maya was the most so & indeed, I understood him the only practicable road, but strongly urged him to wait your arrival, before he took any steps towards retiring. I must observe these conversations took place when I was very much occupied in defending the heights & in the Portuguese language, in which I can explain myself very badly, having as you know, joined the division but two days before & felt particularly unwilling to give any orders, both from not being acquainted with your plans in case of our being attacked by a very superior force & from not being fully acquainted with the country. I beg also to observe, that two of the guns never did go down the Maya road, but in going up the hill in pursuance of your order to take up a position. They stuck in the heavy ground & every effort of the mules with the assistance of the men of the division was ineffectual to get them on. Finding it impossible, the mules were taken off & the guns rendered unserviceable & thrown down the precipice.

To Major General Pringle

Roncesvalles 21st October 8 a.m.

My dear General,

In compliance with your suggestion I ordered yesterday morning 100 Spanish soldiers to occupy the pass of Ortiague. I beg you will put yourself in communication with the officer commanding at the post & I give such instructions as you may think necessary. Pamplona still holds out but I am in hourly expectation of hearing that the governor will offer some propositions. Don Carlos thinks the garrison will attempt to make their escape; Lord W[ellington] has ordered a reinforcement of 2,000 Spaniards to strengthen the blockade. Bad weather for our troops on the hills, I trust however, they will soon be in better situations. Yours faithfully R Hill.

Egerton[86] is at Pamplona ready to give me the earliest intimation of anything particular taking place in that quarter, which I will not fail to communicate you.

Vera 1st November 1813

To Major General Pringle

Los Aldudes

My dear general,

I have written to Sir Rowland Hill to suspend the movements he had been instructed to make on the fall of Pamplona until further orders.

I think it right to apprise you of this direct, and to request at the same time that you will endeavour to have the communication made to Sir Rowland by the most certain and the expedient conveyance. Believe me, faithfully yours, George Murray QMG.[87]

Erratzu 1st November 1813 8 o’clock pm

To Major General Hill

Sir,

I have to request you will without delay forward by a speedy & safe conveyance (an officer) to Sir Rowland Hill, the accompanying letter from the Quarter Master General. You will yourself suspend the execution of any order for march you may have received from Sir Rowland Hill till you receive further orders from him & this is in confidence to you. I have the honour to be your very honourable, W C Beresford

To Major General Pringle

Roncesvalles 3 November 1813

My dear general,

I did not receive your note relative to the unfortunate women of the 2nd Brigade & allowance of rum to the troops, until two or three days after their date. I thank you for having advanced some aide to the former for me. I wish Thorn could have given them any, during this rigorous season, in the way of blankets, but he has none in store. With regard to allowances of spirit to the men, you have my full sanction to make them whole in lieu of half allowances, whenever you deem that the severity of the weather requires it & that those who receive it, are on exposed duty. Your occasionally reporting the so doing will likewise suffice as you suggest. This cruel weather & general discomfort in consequence, makes me anxious for some immediate decision as to our future movements. General Ashworth[88] is I suppose, aware that his people can receive extra rations of sprits from the British commissariat & by British General Orders according to late regulation; you accordingly befriend his worthy soldier’s, I hope, as your own. I have the honour to be, faithfully yours, W Stewart.

Villafranca 12 November 1813

Sergeant Connolly of the 44th Regiment most humbly acknowledges his having signed a paper requiring wood from the commissary in the name of Captain Kersterman[89] which he had no authority from the captain to demand and further to have improperly signed the name of Lieutenant Floyd[90] aide de camp to Lieutenant General Clinton, though in this last instance, without any intention to defraud anyone. And having in consequence of this dishonest, discreditable and improper conduct lost his situation as clerk in the office of the Military Secretary of the commander of the forces. He humbly declares his sense of the lenity of Lieutenant General Clinton in commuting his punishment to a voluntary suspension on his part, from his pay as sergeant in the 44th Regiment for the space of six calendar months from the 10th of this present month, receiving during that time the pay of a private soldier only.

He nevertheless hopes that should the commanding officer in consequence of his continued good conduct, be induced to interpose in his favour, that Lieutenant General Clinton will be disposed to consider him worthy of having at least a part of this fine to which he voluntarily submits himself, remitted. William Connolly Sergeant 44th Regiment

To Major General Pringle

25th November 1813

Sir,

I take the liberty of writing a few lines to you to request you will speak to Colonel Belson, not to press me so hard to pay Mr Berkley[91]. I assure Sir, my going to the bond this morning has not been [through] any neglect of mine, but from the losses I have met with (Colonel Belson thinks I have money in England but I assure Sir, I have not got any). I am willing to go under any stoppages until Mr Berkley is payed). I hope Sir you will take into consideration, my past services and not lay it before Lord Wellington, as it will be the ruin of me and family for ever and another think [sic] I beg leave to mention, when I come to settle with Mr Barkley I will not be near so much to the bond. Inclosed [sic] is a copy of a memorial which I sent Colonel Belson some time back, which I enclose you to show my past services. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient servant, D Aird Quarter Master 28th Regiment.[92]

The army had advanced into France.

Espelette 29 November 1813

Service

To Major General Pringle, Commanding 2nd Brigade 2nd Division,

Remarks on Major General Pringle’s report on half yearly inspection of the corps composing the 2nd Brigade under his command.

60th Light Infantry                            No Remark

28th Regiment                                    The misconduct of the Quarter Master & defalcation in his accounts being before a brigade court of enquiry, my subsequent line of duty will be according to their report. Major General Pringle will be pleased to order a brigade court of enquiry to investigate & report upon the claims stated to be made by many men in this regiment (vide this day’s divisional order). One year’s clothing being due to this regiment, that, which is inspected, should be for the day 1814, and compensation be given to the men for this year’s clothing. Major General Pringle will be pleased to attend to this being done.

34th Regiment                                    I am much gratified by the report on this corps, which I have always returned as one wherein the comfort & discipline of the men & cordiality among the officers has much prevailed. I request that my sentiments, confirmed by Major General Pringle’s report, may be communicated to Lt Colonel Worsley[93] & to the corps.

I approve of the compensation being given to the men in lieu of this year’s clothing & that that which is expected be for the year 1814 & that compensation be quickly given.

The court martial officer numerous. I see a Sergeant Hartly reduced & receiving 50 lashes. Corporal punishment ought to be reserved for the most aggravated of crimes, or the rank of non-commissioned officers will suffer in respect.

39th Regiment                                    I request that my approbation Major General Pringle’s favourable report on this regiment may be communicated to Colonel O’Callaghan[94].

By the Inspection return, the clothing for 1813 appears to be in arrear. Major General Pringle stated one year’s to be declared, this must be for 1812. If so, Major General Pringle will be pleased to direct compensation for the year’s clothing due, to be settled for with the men without delay.

General Remark                               As a measure for most quickly expediting the arrival of the clothing now on its way to the regiments & 60th company. I recommend that an intelligent officer from each corps be immediately dispatched to the port on the coast where it is expected to arrive & that such officer be instructed to have preparatory means ready to forward it to the corps with as little delay as possible.

W Stewart, Lt General

 

PS Major General Pringle having stated that no opportunities have offered of ascertaining that most essential point, the proficiency of each regiment in manoeuvre & exercise under arms, is recommended to embrace early & frequent opportunity of manoeuvring by battalion & brigade, when the weather will permit. WS

 

Larressore, 7 December 1813

To FM The Marquis of Wellington

My Lord,

I am directed by the General Court Martial which sat here this day & of which I am president to transmit to your lordship, their most earnest recommendation for mercy towards Private William Murray of the 28th either by remitting or commuting the sentence of death, which has been awarded against him, having been found guilty of that part of the charge brought against him, of having been seen in a French uniform at Pamplona.

I am directed by the court to state to your lordship that the grounds on which they recommend him to your consideration as an object of mercy on the evident appearances of imbecility & almost idiotism, which he betrayed on his trial & from the testimony of the corporal of pioneers under whose immediate command he was, that he was a person of such weak intellect & to be easily induced to do anything which was proposed to him. These considerations have led the court to believe that he committed the crime of entering into the enemy’s service, under the influence of fear & incapable of judging of the magnitude of the offence he was about to commit. For these grounds the court beg leave to recommend him strongly to your lordship’s mercy. WH Pringle

Annotated across the top – Private William Murray 28th Regiment pardoned 19 December 1813

Larressore,  8 December 1813

Sir,

I beg leave to enclose a copy of my losses in this country, which I hope you will be pleased to take into consideration, as Colonel Belson will not hearken to what I have to say on that subject.

I am Sir, your most obedient, honourable servant, D Aird Quarter Master 28th Regiment

September 1813

Amount of losses sustained by Quarter Master Aird 28th Regiment of Foot.

To shoes & trousers at Vilha Velha occasioned by cars breaking down                                                       £46 0s od

To packs swept overboard when the heavy baggage was on passage from Cork to Harwich             £39 4s 0d

To two horses lost by carrying regimental clothing – 1 at 130 dollars, 1 at 100 dollars                        £53 15s 0d

£138 19s 0d

N.B. When sick many others innumerable but not included.

 

H[ead] Q[uarters] road

12 December [1813] 10 pm

Dear General,

The enemy threaten our rear with cavalry & infantry & I have sent off the 1st Brigade midway to Urcuray. Sir Rowland Hill requests that all baggage may be packed and retired to [the] rear of [the] cantonments at daylight, awaiting orders & the probable events of the morning. I shall thank you to send a mounted officer to one on the Hill by7 ½ am. You are, I hope, acquainted with your line of march to that point, if forced where you are & obliged to retire by Villefranque. Yours faithfully W Stewart.

Divisional Head Quarters

To Major General Pringle 2nd Division

19 December 1813

Sir,

In conformity with the divisional orders of yesterday (no.8) you will be pleased to preside at a court of enquiry, to be held this day, at Vieux Mouguere[95], for the investigation of the conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Bunbury[96], commanding the 3rd Regiment of Buffs, during the action of the 13th instant.

As the subject of enquiry is of the most grave description, tending to affect the character of that officer & the good of His Majesty’s Service, in as much as the spirit of the charges about to be laid against that Field officer by Major General Byng has reference to the 20th article of the 14th section & to the 28th article of the 16th section of war, you will be pleased to impress upon the members of the court, the expediency of their giving the most patient, ample & impartial attention to the matter in question.

Without presuming to anticipate the immediate direction which the investigation by the court will take & which will be naturally guided by the nature of the allegations adduced by Major General Byng & by the sound judgement of the respectable members of that court, it may be permitted that I suggest to you the possibility of the facts elucidated by your enquiry, leading directly to a prosecution of Lieutenant Colonel Bunbury before the highest military tribunal.

Under the possibility of an event, which for the honour of His Majesty’s Army will, I hope, not be found necessary, it will be expedient that the proceedings of the court of enquiry, be pointed directly to those parts of Lieutenant Colonel Bunbury’s conduct on the 13th instant, which may have a full reference to those articles of war under which his future trial, or his present acquittal from all censure, appear equally to be brought.

This is the more necessary, because the court has been directed in divisional orders not to give an opinion on the matter of investigation; the line of proceeding therefore, which after an impartial consideration by myself or by my superiors of the facts adduced by the court it may hereafter be necessary to pursue, will be dictated by the charges against Lieutenant Colonel Bunbury’s conduct being, in the present stage either clearly proved or refuted.

Bearing this important view of the subject, in its present stage & future consequence, in the mind of the court, I request that your proceedings be as expeditiously gone through & transmitted to me as the nature of circumstances & the serious matter before you will permit.  I have the honour to be, Sir, your faithful servant, W Stewart Lieutenant General, commanding 2nd Division

 

To Major General Pringle

Divisional Head Quarters

23rd December 2 pm

Dear General,

I have had communication with Sir Rowland Hill about the 34th quarters & in lieu of our getting any from the 6th Division, General Buchan[97] vacate a sufficiency in La [Henca?] To admit of a wing of one of Colonel Fearon’s[98] battalions whereby those houses which are in front & are the right of Petit Mouguere will be put at your disposal for the 34th. As the access to the front from these houses under the right shoulder of the Beacon hill is easy, I recommend that you give up those houses to the 60th & to two or even three of the 34th companies, but not more. This will make that good corps, I hope, comfortable & a Captain Montgomery[99] is gone to Colonel Worsley, to inform him of the arrangement in order to save time & has ordered the houses in question to be vacated by the Portuguese, the whole, if you approve, can be settled before night fall.

I find it expedient to establish a steady captain, with a subaltern & 20 men at Cambo [Les Bains], & a sergeant & 12 men at Espelette, as aid & guard to our hospital concerns & to enable me to bring away the company of the Buffs at the latter place. Be so good as to select a captain for this special duty & to order a detachment from your brigade of 1 subaltern, 2 sergeants, 1 drummer & 30 rank & file (men of good character) to march after daylight tomorrow morning to Cambo, there to await the captain’s distribution & orders. I shall be glad to see the captain before I mount my horse for the front a few minutes before seven tomorrow morning & as he will be a sort of commandant, I shall thank you to select a good one. I have the honour to be, your faithful servant, W Stewart, Lieutenant General.

The letters that follow, regarding Lieutenant Matthew Kelly, would seem to run inconsistently, but the dates of each letter have been checked and are correct.

To Colonel Belson[100] commanding 28th Foot

Petit Mouguere, 23rd December 1813

Sir,

Having seriously reflected on my late conduct towards you as my commanding officer, I must own it has been highly improper, and for which I am most sincerely sorry and hope that you will have the goodness to pardon me, and permit me to return to my duty, when I most sincerely, and humbly beg your pardon, and which I shall do personally if you require it, with a promise, that I shall never act so improper and un-officer like in future and that I shall, like the rest of my brother officers, do my duty, and willingly obey all your orders.

May I further beg that you will have the goodness to return me my resignation which I in unguarded moment sent in to you. I have the honor to be Sir, your obedient humble servant M. Kelly Lieutenant 28th Foot[101]

To Major General Pringle commanding the 2nd Brigade

27th December 1813

Sir,

I acknowledge I have incurred your displeasure in taking money from the master taylor [sic] of the said regiment. I beg leave to inform you the money he offered to me, but I refused in the evening. The next day he brought to me the money, requesting me to take it. When he found me under arrest, at that time I was confident of paying it, till I was very hard pushed, when I was obliged to balance my account, he saw how I stood. I am your humble servant &c D Aird Quartermaster 28th Regiment.

To Colonel Belson commanding 28th Regiment

Petit Mouguere

3 January [1814]

Sir,

I beg leave to inform you as my inclination leads me to quit the service, I hope therefore you will have the goodness to forward my letter of resignation now in your hands, by so doing you will much oblige. Sir, your obedient servant M. Kelly Lieutenant, 28th Regiment.

To Major General Pringle

4 January 1814

Sir,

Yesterday evening, I received the enclosed note & this morning the adjutant brought me a message that Lieutenant Kelly did not mean to do any more duty & that he was absent from parade (& being for piquet) this morning. I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient servant,

  1. Belson Colonel commanding 28th Regiment

Petit Mouguere 5 January 1814

To Major General Pringle

Sir,

I beg to inform you that all the papers that you sent back to me relative to Lieutenant Kelly’s conduct have been destroyed, except the enclosed, but they all tended to show his determination, which he now has renewed, to do no more duty whatever & his two letters of resignation are both in your hands. I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient humble servant, C. Belson Colonel, commanding the 28th Regiment.

 

20 January [1814]

7 am

Dear General,

Sir Henry Clinton is about to cannonade one of the enemy’s picquet houses in front of General Lambert. This may be related on one of your 34th quarters & as I was writing to Colonel Worsley last night I recommended him either to have his men ready to turnout this morning, or to conceal & not parade. I shall be at St Pierre [-d’Irube] between 8 & 9 when the firing on the left may be expected. Yours faithfully W Stewart

 

12 JANUARY 1814

General Pringle was shot through the body at the action of Garris on 15 February 1814 and was forced to recuperate at St Jean de Luz and he did not rejoin his brigade before the war finished in April 1814.

To Mrs Pringle, 56 Grosvenor Street, London

St Jean de Luz

20th March 1814

On my arrival here my beloved Harriet, I found your dear letters which had been so long missing of 28th and 31st of January & the map &c, for which my love I am very much obliged to you & now I think all your letters since Christmas have arrived safe, there has [been] another mail landed & gone to headquarters, so I am in hourly expectation of some more intelligence from you. I arrived here on the 14th & found myself nothing the worse for my journey. I was very comfortable at Cambo, but I fancied the air did not agree with me & I was a little afraid of a return of ague, so I hastened here, & though the weather is extremely cold, I find the sea air does me a great deal of good, my wounds are doing as well as possible. I have got a very good quarter here, the house that Stopford[102] was in all the winter, but the weather has been so cold I have not gone our since my arrival. They talk much of peace here, but none of the numerous reports here, can be relied on. I am very happy to find I was misinformed in the report I had heard of Lord March’s death[103], he is I understand doing well, though badly wounded, poor Le Marchant is dead[104], but more from consumption than from his wound. I was really extremely sorry at the death of Colonel Hood[105], he will be a great loss to his family, as well as being a very amiable good young man. Pray give my love to Georgy & tell her I am very much obliged to her for her letter, which gave me much pleasure to see. I wrote to you about her school by last mail, I trust by this time that you have got some letters from me since I was wounded, & that your mind is quite at ease respecting me. I am now satisfied about the regiment since I hear it is the prince’s doing. I really think that now Lord Liverpool has a very fair ground to speak to the Duke of York again & as to what Lord Chatham says about it being more satisfying to get a regiment on our own claim alone, I care & feel but little about. I have had a letter from Mr Wright acknowledging the receipt of the bill for £300. I have this moment received my love, The Bridal of Triermain[106] & the supporters sent by Captain Clements[107], for which I am much obliged to you. I wished to see that book for I had seen extracts from it in the review. This instant my Harriet, I have received your dear letter of the 4th of March, it was sent I believe by a messenger from headquarters, I expect in the course of the day to get some other letter from you, though probably now of so late a date. I am very happy you got Wilson’s letter, before you heard any report of my being wounded. I think Lord Bathurst appears to have been very civil on this occasion, long before this, my love, I trust you have received letters from me which have set your mind quite at ease. I wrote to you on the 26th February & 5th & 12th of March. There is but one mail a week, or I should write oftener, whenever I write I assure you & always told you exactly the true state of my arm. My wounds are now nearly healed, that in my back almost entirely so & I should hope no cloth is left in, my only grievance now, is in my shoulder & arm, in which I feel some pain, but nothing of any consequence, but a great deal of weakness & want of power of using, that however the surgeons tell me that certainly, in time I will in a great measure recover it, but I must expect it to take a good deal of time & gentle use. Some of the nerves have been much injured by the shot & I believe there is no remedy but time & patience, however I consider myself as very fortunate in having so much recovered it, as at first I had certainly lost all power of arm & hand. I assure you I have never wanted every possible care & comfort, indeed in many instances, more than I could have had in England, for the number of medical people is so great here. I had great attention from them, for the first fortnight I was obliged to have two surgeons always, night & day in the next room to me & two more in readiness, for the shot went so near the great artery, that they were apprehensive it must have been injured & would probably give way, that was a very unpleasant state of suspense for that time & the preparations they were obliged to make & men being always sitting by my bedside, made me at first a little nervous. I was so much reduced from loss of blood, however I soon got better of it & I now sleep as well & indeed are in every respect as well as ever. You must not expect a word of news from me here, for we are in total ignorance of everything that is going forward & I have had no English newspapers since the 15th of February. I ride out now, whenever the weather is fine, the chestnut horse is again able to carry on & is so quiet that I prefer her to any other, my servant has been very attentive to me & conducted himself very well during my illness. I am very happy to hear you have received so much attention from your friends, Wilson wrote twice to Lord Chatham, which I think he would expect. He should really now hope that I should be among the first to get a regiment. The coast is pretty here in fine weather, but it is dreadfully dangerous in bad weather the beach is all covered with wrecks of vessels lost within this short time. I hope that Mr Hood got my letter which I wrote about the end of January & that the things have been sent as my wardrobe begins to be very much exhausted & being so near Passages here, I can get things without difficulty. I see by the newspapers that a second sheet of the map of the environs of Bayonne, has been published at Stockdales[108], which I shall thank you to get for me & send by the mail & take care they do not send the same sheet you got at first & also a map of the environs of Bordeaux which I see was also to be published then the beginning of March, which I beg you will also send by the same conveyance. I hear General Beresford & part of our army are at Bordeaux & that they have been received very well there, I hear that in front our troops find everything very plenty [sic] & cheap, here everything is very dear & bad, & I grudge every guinea I am obliged out away from you. I have written a few lines today to my mother & probably next week I shall write to Lord Chatham. I hope my love, you will write often, as your dear letters are my only comfort. God bless you my beloved Harriet, give my love to the children & believe me ever your most faithful & affectionate husband. WH Pringle.

To Mrs Pringle, 56 Grosvenor Street, London

St Jean de Luz, 27th March 1814

I have to thank you my beloved Harriet, for your letter of the 8th which I received a few days ago, that of the 4th I acknowledged in my last letter, but I have not yet got the intermediate letters or papers. They were sent to headquarters & I fancy the army has been moving about, which is the cause of their not being sent here. It is very tiresome being deprived of them for so long. I continue to go on as well as possible, my wounds are nearly healed up, that in my back entirely so, but I don’t think my shoulder gets well as fast as I hoped it would, I have still a good deal of pain in it, but that I believe I must expect for a long time. It is very true that I was on horseback on the 16th & 17th, I thought it was an easier way to be moved, than being carried & the surgeon thought the wound would be less likely to bleed in that position than lying down. In wounds like mine through the body, it is impossible to tell for the 12 or 14 first days, what degree of danger there is. When the first dressings were taken off, which was on 21st of February, the surgeons thought the direction of the ball appeared less dangerous than they at first apprehended, not quite so near the great artery. There was a branch of the artery cut, which caused me to lose so much blood, which I think the surgeons called the thoracic artery, however that healed of itself. There are various reports here, of the success of the allies, but there is no dependence on anything we hear & we are quite ignorant of what is going on in our own army. I own I had thought, we should have had peace before this time, but I do not know what to think now, I suppose that by this time Lord Chatham will be in town & I hope he will do what he promised about finding out what are the Duke of York’s intentions respecting the disposal of regiments. I really think from the number that have been given away since Lord Liverpool’s letter, I had a right to expect one, but I should hope that this accident will at least put him in mind of his promise. The papers talk of his going out of office, but I should doubt it. There is an officer of the 4th going from here & I shall send you by him, Lord Liverpool’s letter to Lord Eliot as you desire. I shall also send you those reports of General Stewart’s, which you mentioned in a former letter. I wish such things would take such a turn as would enable me to go home to you. I feel very anxious to see you again. I have [been having?] sex dreams about you my Harriet, this night or two past, which makes me low & uncomfortable, though I know it is very foolish. I hope my love you have got all my letters regularly & safe, I have taken every precaution in my power in sending them, but really there is the greatest neglect in the post office department here, everyone complains of it. What made me most unhappy, when I was first wounded, was I was afraid I should die, before I recovered the use of my arm sufficiently to write to you. I could not bear the thoughts of leaving you, without being able to tell you, how much I loved you & how happy you had made me. There has been no mail from headquarters these four days, so we are in ignorance of what is going forward, there are reports that we have fallen back, in consequence of Suchet having joined Soult but there is no reliance in them. The weather is much against all operations, we have a great deal of rain here.

The brigade of Life Guards has just marched through here to join the army, they look very well & are in good order, but it is quite ridiculous to see how helpless they are, particularly the officers, they expect to find stables & everything ready for them as they do in London. Poor John’s grief about my wound was extraordinary, I hope [the] poor fellow will have a good fortune in his military career about his wounds as I have always had. God bless you my darling creature, give my love to the dear children & believe me ever your most faithful & affectionate husband. WH Pringle

 

To Major General Pringle

Hawkstone[109]

10 August 1814

My dear general,

I have this moment received your letter of the 7th on the subject of Major Wilson[110]. I beg to assure you that with every possible desire to oblige you & the major, I cannot at this moment give him a staff situation, at the same time, with truth I assure you, that I shall bear in mind your wishes respecting Major Wilson & should I meet him in America[111] I shall be most happy, should it [ever?] be in my power to serve him. Believe me my dear Sir, to be yours very sincerely, Hill.

I believe I shall sail from Cork early in the next month & if Wilson likes to go out at the same time, I will procure him a passage & give him every assistance he may require.

 

[1] Lt Colonel William Gomm.

[2] Manchester Street runs into Manchester Square in London. The Georgian property no. 16 still exists.

[3] A servant.

[4] The George Inn has stood on London Road in Portsmouth for over three hundred years.

[5] Major General Alexander John Goldie. He proceeded to sail to join Wellington’s staff in May 1812, but had returned home due to ill health by July 1812. He lived until 1848.

[6] Major Edward Charles Cocks 16th Light Dragoons, was an intelligence officer for Wellington. He died at the siege of Burgos on 8 October 1812.

[7] His brother James Somers Cocks came out to Lisbon and the mention dining with Admiral Berkeley there. They do not mention Pringle at all.

[8] He retired on ill health shortly after.

[9] Lord Liverpool was Secretary of State for War until the murder of Spencer Percival, when he was made Prime Minister.

[10] Rueda is about six miles south of Tordesillas.

[11] Unfortunately, this letter has not been found.

[12] Pringle took over General Walker’s 2nd Brigade of the 5th Division, consisting of 1st and 2nd Battalions 4th Foot, 2/30th and 2/44th.

[13] Harriet’s uncle the Honourable John Eliot had gained the earldom (as 2nd Earl) on her father’s death.

[14] John Pitt, the 2nd Earl of Chatham, was another uncle, her mother being a daughter of William Pitt.

[15] This return is different to the larger return for the entire army published by Charles Oman. The losses of each regiments are consistently higher than Oman’s and must be presumed to be the more correct.

[16] Now Cannon Place in Brighton.

[17] Lord Chatham was Colonel of the 4th Foot, both battalions of which fought at Salamanca.

[18] Major General Galbraith Lowry Cole was recorded as severely wounded ‘but not dangerously’.

[19] Lieutenant General William Carr Beresford, Marshal of the Portuguese Army was severely wounded.

[20] Major General John Gaspard Le Marchant commanding a brigade of heavy cavalry was killed at Salamanca.

[21] Major John Piper 4th Foot

[22] Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton 30th Foot.

[23] Captain Robert Anwyll Brigade Major.

[24] Major Alured Dodsworth Faunce 4th Foot.

[25] Lieutenant Pearce of the 44th Foot took the eagle of the 62ere Regiment

[26] Lt Colonel James Brooker took command of the brigade when Pringle took command of the division when Leith was wounded.

[27] Major David Williamson 4th Foot.

[28] Captain Thomas Bradgate Bamford 30th Foot.

[29] Captain Thomas Ballard 44th Foot.

[30] Lieutenant William Pearce 44th Foot.

[31] Brevet Lieutenant Colonel George Harding 44th Foot.

[32] Paymaster C. Hancorn 2nd Battalion 4th Foot.

[33] There were two Deputy Paymaster Generals in Portugal at this time, John Paramor Boys and Stanhope Hunter.

[34] Captain George Davis Willson 4th Foot, aide de camp to General Pringle.

[35] Lieutenant Colonel Lord Charles Somerset Manners 23rd Light Dragoons, aide de camp to Lord Wellington.

[36] Lieutenant Colonel Sir Stapleton Cotton was severely wounded at Salamanca.

[37] Probably the Army Agent, Major Wright of 36 Well-Close Square, London.

[38] The name of the horse killed at Salamanca.

[39] The Globe newspaper was published from 1803 until 1921.

[40] Torrequemada is a small town situated a few miles south-east of Caceres.

[41] Major General Richard Hulse died on 7 September 1812.

[42] Major General William Wheatley died at Madrid on 1 September 1812.

[43] A village in the valley of the River Tormes about twelve miles south west of Burgos.

[44] Major General Henry Clinton commanded 6th Division.

[45] Major General William Anson.

[46] Brigadier General Denis Pack commanded a Portuguese Brigade.

[47] Brevet Colonel James Stirling.

[48] 11th Light Dragoons.

[49] Brevet Colonel the Honourable William Ponsonby.

[50] Major General Eberhard Otto von Bock.

[51] Brigadier General Thomas Bradford.

[52] Rioseras is a few miles north east of Burgos.

[53] Brevet Lieutenant Colonel John Fox Burgoyne commanding the Royal Engineers in Spain.

[54] A large bundle of sticks which helped to fill ditches so that troops could pass.

[55] A large wicker basket which could be filled with earth or stone to offer protection.

[56] Lieutenant General Sir Edward Paget.

[57] Her pregnancy.

[58] Audley End is a beautiful house, situated just outside Saffron Walden, it was the home of the Neville family.

[59] Lieutenant Colonel the Honourable Charles James Greville temporarily commanded a brigade in the 5th Division at this time.

[60] Captain Michael Childers 11th Light Dragoons

[61] Lieutenant Colonel John Elley, Royal Horse Guards, Assistant Adjutant General to the Cavalry

[62] Major General John Oswald.

[63] Captain John Guthrie 44th Foot.

[64] Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Henry Craufurd 9th Foot.

[65] Lieutenant Gebhardt Hulsen Brunswick corps.

[66] Captain & Lieutenant Colonel the Honourable Arthur Percy Upton, 1st Foot Guards, who was Assistant Quarter Master General of the 1st Division.

[67] His sick servant.

[68] This would appear to refer to Ensign the Honourable William Dawson 1st Foot Guards, who resigned from the Army at the end of 1813.

[69] John Loftus the 2nd Marquess of Ely had married the Honourable Alicia Maude in May 1807.

[70] Inspector of Hospitals James McGregor.

[71] Staff Surgeon John Cole.

[72] In the Roncesvalles Pass.

[73] Lieutenant Colonel William Fenwick of the 34th Foot, was captured and held as a prisoner of war until the September.

[74] Ensign Carey Le Marchant 1st Foot Guards aide de camp to General Stewart.

[75] Captain August Heise 2nd Light Battalion KGL, Assistant Adjutant General to the 2nd Division.

[76] Captain William Thornhill 7th Light Dragoons.

[77] These figures again differ slightly from those published by Oman.

[78] A clear error

[79] Captain Nathaniel Thorn, 3rd Foot, Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General to the 2nd Division.

[80] Major General George Walker, he commanded a brigade in the 2nd Division for a very short period

[81] Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Abercromby 28th Foot, Assistant Quarter Master General.

[82] Deputy Commissary General Charles Aylmer.

[83] Major Alexander Cairncross 94th Foot.

[84] Lieutenant Colonel John Macdonald of the 14th Portuguese Line Regiment.

[85] Major General John Byng.

[86] Brevet Major Richard Egerton, 34th Foot, Deputy Assistant Adjutant General to the 2nd Division.

[87] Major General Sir George Murray, Quarter Master General.

[88] Brigadier General Charles Ashworth serving with the Portuguese army.

[89] Captain William Brewse Kersterman 19th Foot, Staff Assistant Adjutant General.

[90] Lieutenant Henry Floyd 19th Light Dragoons, aide de camp to General William Henry Clinton.

[91] This would appear to refer to Lieutenant Colonel George Berkeley, Staff Assistant Adjutant General.

[92] Quarter Master David Aird 28th Foot.

[93] Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Henry Worsley 34th Foot.

[94] Brevet Colonel the Honourable Robert William O’Callaghan 39th Foot.

[95] Mouguere is 2 miles south east of Bayonne.

[96] Lieutenant Colonel William Henry Bunbury. In command of the Buffs, he was attacked by overwhelming numbers but on being forced back, he lost his head and apparently left the field.

[97] Brigadier General John Buchan commanding the 2nd Portuguese Brigade.

[98] Lieutenant Colonel Peter Fearon 6th Cacadores.

[99] Captain Henry Montgomery 50th Foot Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General.

[100] Lieutenant Colonel Charles Philip Belson 28th Foot.

[101] Lieutenant Matthew Kelly continued to serve with the regiment in Spain so he must have been allowed to cancel his resignation.

[102] Major General the Honourable Edward Stopford.

[103] Captain Charles Lennox, Earl of March, 52nd Foot. He was an extra aide de camp and was severely wounded at the Battle of Orthez.

[104] Lieutenant & Captain Carey Le Marchant, 1st Foot Guards, aide de camp to General Stewart, was severely wounded at the Battle of the Nive on 13 December 1813 and died of his wounds on 12 March 1814.

[105] Captain and Lieutenant Colonel the Honourable Francis Wheeler Hood, 3rd Foot Guards, Assistant Adjutant General, was killed at the action of Aire.

[106] A Poem by Sir Walter Scott.

[107] Almost certainly Captain John Marcus Clements, 18th Light Dragoons, aide de camp to Marshal Beresford.

[108] John Stockdale’s A New Military Map of Spain and Portugal, compiled from the nautical surveys of Don Vincente Tofiño, the new provincial maps of Don Thomas Lopez, the large map of the Pyrennees by Roussell and various original documents, published in London in September 1812. It is a huge folding map on 4 sheets, in total approx 218 x 166 cms, dissected into 72 panels and laid on linen as issued, with original hand-colour in outline, and its publisher’s slipcase with printed title label. Publication was advertised in the press in a case or on rollers the price was £5 5s. The Bayonne map would be one of the additions for the war in France.

 

[109] Sir Rowland Hill’s family home in Shropshire.

[110] Brevet Major George Davis Wilson 4th Foot, aide de camp to General Pringle.

[111] General Hill was obviously expecting to sail for America to help the effort against the United States of America, in the War of 1812. However, peace was declared in January 1815 and Hill served at Waterloo instead.

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